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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 04:46:22 PM 
Started by RolandSWL - Last post by W1ITT
I live in Maine.  I'm inland about 40 miles from the coast and we get ice, snow and wind.  I've had a Universal Aluminum 70 footer, 18 inch face, up for over 40 years.  Being a belt and suspenders sort of fellow, even though it's listed as self supporting, I bracket it at 20 and guy with Phillystran at 50 feet. The top 20 feet is self supported and I've had various yagis and various other things up there without incident.
I spent a lot of time as a field service engineer for TCI, all over the world.  We supplied, among other things, a 4 to 30 mhz rotary log periodic antenna, all aluminum on an aluminum tower. 100 foot boom and it was nearly 100 feet up, with a big hydraulic rotor in the head.  I once put one on 75M from Puerto Rico at 50 watts.  SWR was still OK and it was a real boomer.  These were in all environments, Puerto Rico, Azores, Japan, Romania and a bunch of other nifty spots .  Aluminum is fine for towers.
Check your local zoning office...generally the "code enforcement guy" in most Maine towns and ask to see any tower ordinances.  Aside from some subdivisions in suburbia, things are pretty reasonable up here.  Frost can go down as far as 5 feet when we have a real winter so don't scrimp on foundations and guy anchors..  And don't be too proud about being from New York.  We don;t have many prejudices in Maine, but that can be one of them.
73 de Norm W1ITT

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 12:44:16 PM 
Started by RolandSWL - Last post by KD1SH
 Actually, there are some serious aluminum towers available:
https://www.alumatower.com/products/towers/amateur-radio-operators/
  I can't personally vouch for them, since I haven't used one, but I've communicated with the company, gotten a quote, and been quite impressed.
  Not only have towers gotten obscenely expensive in the last twenty years or so—check out the U.S Towers prices—but where you'll really pay through the nose is in shipping costs, depending on where you live. My shipping quote from Alumatower was roughly $1000, which included $450 for the wooden shipping crate—a lot of money for something that will probably become firewood once its job is done. Considering that a steel tower would be vastly heavier, the shipping costs would necessarily be higher still.
 
Better be prepared to drag out the check book, a Rohn SSV 100 foot self-supporting is going to be pricey, just a regular Rohn 65G 100ft guyed tower will set you back around 17 to 18K not including installation. Most Hams just do a 25G or 45G sections and beyond forty or fifty feet guy them. I have a forty-foot 45G non guyed and that works for me.
Don’t think any serious towers are built of aluminum, that’s just for lighting trusses and things like that.
Certain others know more and are more experienced on the subject.
 


 3 
 on: Yesterday at 11:11:53 AM 
Started by RolandSWL - Last post by W3SLK
RolandSWL said:
Quote
The wife and I are planning our escape from Long island, N.Y. to the greener pastures of Maine.
She wants a move in ready house and I want land to engage in nefarious radio activities.
I have a fantasy to erect one or two self supporting towers of at least 100 feet in height.
My question is, aluminum or steel? Is one better than the other considering that the climate in Maine
can be icy and windy in winter? The tower(s) will be used to support a beam and the associated
effluvia and also wire antennas. Perhaps I'll shunt feed the tower itself.
What say you?
I think if there was any one person on this board who could answer your question it would be Tom, K1JJ. He lives up in CT and has quite the antenna farm!

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 10:05:58 AM 
Started by RolandSWL - Last post by KA3EKH
Better be prepared to drag out the check book, a Rohn SSV 100 foot self-supporting is going to be pricey, just a regular Rohn 65G 100ft guyed tower will set you back around 17 to 18K not including installation. Most Hams just do a 25G or 45G sections and beyond forty or fifty feet guy them. I have a forty-foot 45G non guyed and that works for me.
Don’t think any serious towers are built of aluminum, that’s just for lighting trusses and things like that.
Certain others know more and are more experienced on the subject.
 

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 09:22:53 AM 
Started by RolandSWL - Last post by RolandSWL
The wife and I are planning our escape from Long island, N.Y. to the greener pastures of Maine.
She wants a move in ready house and I want land to engage in nefarious radio activities.
I have a fantasy to erect one or two self supporting towers of at least 100 feet in height.
My question is, aluminum or steel? Is one better than the other considering that the climate in Maine
can be icy and windy in winter? The tower(s) will be used to support a beam and the associated
effluvia and also wire antennas. Perhaps I'll shunt feed the tower itself.
What say you?

 6 
 on: June 12, 2024, 02:41:46 PM 
Started by W1RC - Last post by W1RC
My great popularity and influence being at stake here, I wonder if you can manage to get
the DATE of the spring NEARFEST into the month of MAY, so that we get some
nicer and warmer weather?? JUNE would not be out of the question, imho.

This April stuff, sorry, it's a problem.

Yes this is only one of the advantages of moving to the new venue.  We will be going back to our original schedule, first weekend in May. 

 7 
 on: June 12, 2024, 10:21:14 AM 
Started by W1RC - Last post by W1ITT
https://www.youtube.com/shorts/snG4AEVp2tU
Here's a quick look at the new venue.
73 de Norm W1ITT

 8 
 on: June 12, 2024, 10:15:44 AM 
Started by Opcom - Last post by W3SLK
Looking at the different 'Eastern European' parts site, it seems the Russians used variometers more so than those on this side of the world!

 9 
 on: June 12, 2024, 01:28:14 AM 
Started by pe1mph - Last post by pe1mph
NOW!!

Time by us in Holland: 07.25 hour in the morning.
And I am now 100% sure I hear Tim WA1HLR on +/- 7290 khz in AM.
But... but his signal is weak, oh so weak....
I can hear only a few words, no more.

Tim talks with?
That station to weak for me.... only a very little carrier.....
I listen now on my own radio, Kenwood R 5000 in our livingroom!
Antenna 2x +/- 33 meters.

Freq 7290 now totaly clean / free by me. Wink


Greetings,

Henk / pe1mph

 10 
 on: June 11, 2024, 09:20:48 PM 
Started by Opcom - Last post by W7TFO
Many hams have lost sight of the advantages of varying the L, rather than the C of a resonant circuit.

One of those advantages is when rotated, a vario can represent in- or out- of phase coils, therefore can subtract or add L over the median point, unlike a variable cap.

Variometers were an answer before roller inductors were widespread.

73DG

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