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Video of 300 kw SW AM Broadcast TX in the UK




 
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Author Topic: Video of 300 kw SW AM Broadcast TX in the UK  (Read 5854 times)
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N4zed
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« on: January 31, 2015, 05:13:39 AM »

You might enjoy this one..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5EVWuSs-g
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Ken<br />N4zed
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Patrick J. / KD5OEI
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2015, 11:42:56 AM »

drool.. Great stuff like this is why I wanted to be a BC engineer. I guess one would have had to work one's way up from the lowly 500W AM station for 20 years to be qualified for a plum position like that gentleman's. I'd still be happy to work at a small station but there seem no local or full time opportunities and it's been said the technical people are not respected (or paid) as in the past. Thanks for posting that video, it's beautiful equipment!
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Radio Candelstein - Flagship Station of the NRK Radio Network.
KL7OF
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2015, 11:55:47 AM »

Can you say MARCONI?Huh     I see they use a pair of 813s in the low level of the audio ...everything else is water cooled.....(he says "steam cooled")  I enjoyed the vid....
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flintstone mop
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2015, 02:01:54 PM »

Senders

QSYing looks like a bear...and that design is for a Deep style cabinet, instead of wide.
Nice video
The narrator was interesting to hear. Knew his stuff

Fred
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Fred KC4MOP
n2bc
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2015, 09:02:53 PM »

Give new meaning to "plug in" coils!
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WA1MNQ
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« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2015, 10:36:47 PM »

Very nice video tour! Thanks for posting the link. I work re-building / repairing large water cooled induction heaters, tube type, up to 600 kilowatts output and I was glad to see such a nice job the OEM did on the setup and stage by stage interlock system.

I also thought the CE did a very good job on the walk through and clearly, if there were a problem while operating, he would head straight to the issue needing attention.


After working on eye straining surface mount technology these days such as we have to do, it is nice to be able to step right into a walk in rig.

Mike
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W3LSN
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2015, 07:04:04 AM »

That was a very interesting video.  It was several decades ago, but I used to run an old General Electric BT-25A (50kW)  built in similar style at WPTR in Albany, NY.  It was fixed frequency MW, no plug-in coils of course, but I recognize much in common.  The building built around the transmitter, enormous transformers and chokes in a vault, banks of oil capacitors, walk-in cabinets, successive stages of tube amplification, similar control ladder, large nitrogen-filled variable capacitors, great efforts needed for cooling each stage, etc.  I thoroughly enjoyed this.

73,
Jim
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W1ITT
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2015, 08:46:18 AM »

A few years ago, I was involved in replacing most of the HF curtain arrays at the BBC's Eastern Mediterranean Relay Station.   I spent most of my days outdoors playing with the "aerials", and getting them tuned up to better than 1.35 SWR across an octave.  Occasionally, during power testing, I went inside the transmitter hall.  Note that these places of glory are not transmitter rooms or buildings or shacks, but "halls".  There were about a dozen such transmitters, some running and some ready to meet a time and frequency at a given antenna azimuth.  Output was balanced and fed into a matrix that allowed any transmitter into any antenna.
The transmitter engineers were all pretty sharp cookies, knew their equipment, and were able to resolve problems quickly.  Sadly, that site is now down due to budget and attitude problems.  There are those in high places who believe that short wave can be replaced by an internet feed.  That works pretty well, except in places out of town, or where the powers that be have decreed that the common people should not be permitted to listen to certain things.
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Steve - K4HX
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« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2015, 09:56:21 AM »

Yep. The internet or certain things on it can be blocked (although not always completely or forever) in a given country. It's much harder to block megawatts of RF.

I wish they would have shown some of the arrays in that video.
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flintstone mop
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« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2015, 04:43:07 PM »

A few years ago, I was involved in replacing most of the HF curtain arrays at the BBC's Eastern Mediterranean Relay Station.   I spent most of my days outdoors playing with the "aerials", and getting them tuned up to better than 1.35 SWR across an octave.  Occasionally, during power testing, I went inside the transmitter hall.  Note that these places of glory are not transmitter rooms or buildings or shacks, but "halls".  There were about a dozen such transmitters, some running and some ready to meet a time and frequency at a given antenna azimuth.  Output was balanced and fed into a matrix that allowed any transmitter into any antenna.
The transmitter engineers were all pretty sharp cookies, knew their equipment, and were able to resolve problems quickly.  Sadly, that site is now down due to budget and attitude problems.  There are those in high places who believe that short wave can be replaced by an internet feed.  That works pretty well, except in places out of town, or where the powers that be have decreed that the common people should not be permitted to listen to certain things.

Those megawatts of shortwave energy might be the only way information will get around the world if the internet takes a major crap in a world-wide way.
There seems to be more activity of shortwave stations from the USA, above 7.300 lately.

Fred
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Fred KC4MOP
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