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Tropicalization Lacquer questions-




 
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WX1WX
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« on: July 28, 2014, 07:59:58 AM »

What were some of the common componets of Tropicalization Lacquers? What are some good solvents for it when working on treated equipment?

After restoration should I consider application of a new coat for that "golden look" and charactoristic hot iron smell? (which I really like personally) Or is this just too crazy to consider? Fungicidal tropicalization lacquers evidently are still available!

I am working on a Hallicrafters' 610-E (not treated) A SX-28 (not treated) and a 610-F (heavily treated; marked treated May of '49)

Any advise or thoughts help--- and Thanks!

de WX1WX
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de WX1WX
On the Road in the Airstream
kb4qaa
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2014, 09:58:26 AM »

I researched the MSDS of the components of Milspec antifungus treatment a couple years ago and posted results in a discussion here on the board.

As I recall, it is not terribly toxic and the main ingredient is still used in special medical topical (skin) solutions today.

Mostly don't lick any components nor your hands after working with the radio. Wash your hands thouroughly, but then we always do that after handling anything with solder. Right? Smiley

Denatured alcohol (ethanol) is probably the best solvent, to minimized damage to components.  

Henry Rogers at the Western Historic Radio Museum has a discussion on fungus treatment and a method he used to simulate application. You will have to dig around on his site. (for the life of me I see no reason to do this, but I'm not running a museum).
http://www.radioblvd.com/WWII-PostWar%20Hamgear.htm

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kb4qaa
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2014, 10:41:08 AM »

OK, took some digging.

Here is what I what I found on military MFP, Moisture and Fungus Proofing compound active ingredients a couple years ago.

http://amfone.net/Amforum/index.php?topic=33352.0

Quote

Copper 8-quinolinolate was introduced in 1956, so is unlikely to have been used before that.   It is used to treat wood, and is approved for use in farming in contact with foodstuffs and vegetables.  Mild skin irritation is possible according to notes.

Salicylanilide is derived from the base for Aspirin (Salycylic acid) and Aniline (used to make aniline dyes, which are kind of nasty).  It and a number of variants are or have been used as antifungals, anti-worm, and antiseptics, primarily in topical (skin) treatments and soaps.   Comment: Don't put it in your mouth, wash your hands afterwards and you probably won't have problems.

Comment: Military radio manuals emphasize using solvents to clean solder joints of MFP before working.  This is good advice for effective soldering and to reduce exposure to whatever is in that particular MFP solution.  I would also recommend minimizing breathing the fumes.

bill
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WX1WX
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2014, 08:09:04 AM »

Thanks for the great input gang- Makes for pretty interesting reading! and good advise-

de WX1WX
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de WX1WX
On the Road in the Airstream
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