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Hallicrafters SX-88 Restoration Advice....




 
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WQ9E
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« Reply #50 on: March 18, 2011, 11:23:04 AM »

I am glad the silicone came off in one piece without taking anything else with it.  The rest should be a simple repair.  One wonders why the person who repaired this didn't do it properly in the first place since it is a fair amount of work to access this part of the receiver. 

Make sure you pair this receiver with a decent speaker to take advantage of its wide bandwidth IF and audio system.  I use a R-42 with mine and it sounds great with good source material. 

I have some additional advertising and other SX-88 related stuff that I will scan for you.  Next week is very busy but after that I will have time to get this stuff to you for your SX-88 collection.

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Rodger WQ9E
n2len
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« Reply #51 on: March 18, 2011, 02:24:57 PM »

I am glad the silicone came off in one piece without taking anything else with it.  The rest should be a simple repair.  One wonders why the person who repaired this didn't do it properly in the first place since it is a fair amount of work to access this part of the receiver. 

Make sure you pair this receiver with a decent speaker to take advantage of its wide bandwidth IF and audio system.  I use a R-42 with mine and it sounds great with good source material. 

I have some additional advertising and other SX-88 related stuff that I will scan for you.  Next week is very busy but after that I will have time to get this stuff to you for your SX-88 collection.



I am glad as well...I haven't the slightest clue why it wasn't repaired before. The pointer wheel is held on with a very small "C" type clip. If you look at the previous picture you can clearly see it. It is quite tiny. If I was able to remove that clip, then the wheel itself, repair would be very easy with the better results. However, repair while it's in place should work out fine too.

If you reommend the R-42 speaker, then that's what I'll look for.
Any advertising stuff any paper work, color or black & white, please do scan at your convenience. I will gladly pay you for your time and postage.
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n2len
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« Reply #52 on: March 18, 2011, 08:40:17 PM »

Rodger,

I was able to carefully remove the tiny "C" clip using 2 dentist picks. After the clip was removed, The pointer wheel just slid off. I ended up using a sewing needle cut to size then bent at the proper angle. It actually fit into the swell of where the original pin snapped off.  I also took your advice and used JB Kwik Weld for the adhesive. The JB Kwik sets in only 4 minutes, total bond after 4 hours.

Here is a quick picture of the pointer cam and "C" clip.


* 100_0313.JPG (2145.23 KB, 4000x3000 - viewed 1034 times.)

* 100_0314.JPG (1652.28 KB, 4000x3000 - viewed 1034 times.)
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WQ9E
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« Reply #53 on: March 18, 2011, 09:10:51 PM »

Len,

It looks like a  very good repair and the IF transformer repair should be even easier.  You are going to have a great set of before and after restoration photos when you finish this project.
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Rodger WQ9E
n2len
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« Reply #54 on: March 18, 2011, 09:14:10 PM »

Len,

It looks like a  very good repair and the IF transformer repair should be even easier.  You are going to have a great set of before and after restoration photos when you finish this project.

Thanks....
I agree...Tomorrow I will touch up on the pointer wheel, if it needs any further adhesive.
After I re-install it, next will be the IF can repair.
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n2len
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« Reply #55 on: March 19, 2011, 08:01:41 AM »

Right pointer wheel repaired and re-installed.

After the initial JB Kwik adhesive was used. About 4 hours later, I reapplied a little more fanning it out from the bottom with a toothpick. This morning, I simply slipped it back onto it's cam and reapplied the "C" clip. A black felt tip market was used to color the JB weld black.

The only setback was on the first attempt at snapping the "C" ring back, it went "BING" and flew across the room. After about 1 hour of search and rescue, on my knees (with a flashlight) it was recovered.
This thing it TINY!

The pointer control now works perfectly!

Any suggestions to remove the black spray paint that was used to paint the 5 switch levers on the front?


* 100_0315.JPG (1810.43 KB, 4000x3000 - viewed 1105 times.)
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aafradio
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« Reply #56 on: March 19, 2011, 08:12:28 AM »

Any suggestions to remove the black spray paint that was used to paint the 5 switch levers on the front?

Yup - Q-tips and MEK from the paint section of your local home store (except in California, I suspect).  Be sure to do it in a well ventilated area.  MEK isn't the worst of the solvents from a health standpoint, but it is potentially more intrusive than acetone, for example.

To forstall the concerns of some who have not used it, here's a reasonable summary of cautions:  http://www.bfksolutions.com/Newsletter%20Archives/V3-Issue%203/MEK%20No%20Longer%20HAP.html
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73,
Mike  KC4TOS
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n2len
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« Reply #57 on: March 19, 2011, 08:28:25 AM »

Any suggestions to remove the black spray paint that was used to paint the 5 switch levers on the front?

Yup - Q-tips and MEK from the paint section of your local home store (except in California, I suspect).  Be sure to do it in a well ventilated area.  MEK isn't the worst of the solvents from a health standpoint, but it is potentially more intrusive than acetone, for example.

Thanks,
That was exactly what I was looking for. I'll check Home Depot this afternoon....
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n2len
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« Reply #58 on: March 19, 2011, 10:25:45 AM »

2 Rear Left IF can repair....


* 100_0317.JPG (2076.07 KB, 4000x3000 - viewed 1067 times.)
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n2len
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« Reply #59 on: March 19, 2011, 12:45:23 PM »

What is the best cleaner polish for aluminum?

I would like to clean and polish the side panels and tube shields...
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aafradio
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« Reply #60 on: March 19, 2011, 01:28:58 PM »

It depends on what you mean by polish.  See http://amfone.net/Amforum/index.php?topic=24506.msg182212#msg182212 for a wide ranging discussion of the subject.  Grin
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73,
Mike  KC4TOS
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kg8lb
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« Reply #61 on: March 19, 2011, 01:42:59 PM »

Also, I forgot to add, JUST IN CASE there is a possibility, make sure it's not made out of magnesium BEFORE you add any flame?
 
73, Phil

  Actually , open flames on magnesium parts are no real problem. Although I seriously doubt this is a magnesium part.
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KC4VWU
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« Reply #62 on: March 19, 2011, 02:31:09 PM »

Len,
        I couldn't possibly get to the task in a timely manner due to all other things going on here besides the big task of moving. Looking through your recent posts though, it seems it's in fragile shape and if the others advised you it wouldn't survive, they would know much better than myself because I don't have any first hand knowledge of the rig.

I agree in that you would probably be much better off to have one made from aluminum if a suitable replacement couldn't be located. Even though it is badly disfigured, it would be much better for the existing bezel to be in one piece so that a machinist could more easily get the measurements he needs.

Another thing that came to mind is casting one from resin (better than nothing at this point) which would also present the problem of needing a good donor to make a mold.

Wasn't too sure of the flammability issues of magnesium, just remember the stories I've heard about the old style mag wheels on cars catching fire. Probably just old wive's tales used to embellish old war stories of drag racing.

73, Phil
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kg8lb
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« Reply #63 on: March 19, 2011, 04:06:44 PM »

You will likely find that a vacum bagged epoxy-glass layup is far more stable than most resin materials . Especially with the long spans and thin sections.  A good pattern maker should be able to make up a suitable form if a decent sample is made available. If I had a bezel you would be welcome to borrow it. Sadly I do not. My buddy up in West Branch MI (Ron Hattner, N8UUH)  has one , maybe I can borrow his and get a pattern made up for you. I will try to speak with him this week end.

  Torches aren't a big issue when working mag alloys. We TIG and Oxy-Acetylene work it often. Wink
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n2len
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« Reply #64 on: March 19, 2011, 04:40:51 PM »

It depends on what you mean by polish.  See http://amfone.net/Amforum/index.php?topic=24506.msg182212#msg182212 for a wide ranging discussion of the subject.  Grin

Just looking for something to assist with removing the dirt on the chassis with a Q-TIP.
Also a polish for the tube shields...
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n2len
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« Reply #65 on: March 19, 2011, 04:42:56 PM »

Also, I forgot to add, JUST IN CASE there is a possibility, make sure it's not made out of magnesium BEFORE you add any flame?
 
73, Phil

  Actually , open flames on magnesium parts are no real problem. Although I seriously doubt this is a magnesium part.

Definitely not magnesium... Maybe more like Pot metal...
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n2len
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« Reply #66 on: March 19, 2011, 04:46:17 PM »

Len,
        I couldn't possibly get to the task in a timely manner due to all other things going on here besides the big task of moving. Looking through your recent posts though, it seems it's in fragile shape and if the others advised you it wouldn't survive, they would know much better than myself because I don't have any first hand knowledge of the rig.

I agree in that you would probably be much better off to have one made from aluminum if a suitable replacement couldn't be located. Even though it is badly disfigured, it would be much better for the existing bezel to be in one piece so that a machinist could more easily get the measurements he needs.

Another thing that came to mind is casting one from resin (better than nothing at this point) which would also present the problem of needing a good donor to make a mold.

Wasn't too sure of the flammability issues of magnesium, just remember the stories I've heard about the old style mag wheels on cars catching fire. Probably just old wive's tales used to embellish old war stories of drag racing.

73, Phil

I'm working on trying to get the original blue prints or if there was a CNC program saved when the original replicas were made.

I was speaking to several friends about the possibility of making a blue print from my bezel.
But I don't have a CAD program to do so....
Maybe someone who does drafting work may be able to assist.
I will take the original bezel over to a machine shop for there evaluation next week,
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n2len
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« Reply #67 on: March 19, 2011, 04:47:30 PM »

You will likely find that a vacum bagged epoxy-glass layup is far more stable than most resin materials . Especially with the long spans and thin sections.  A good pattern maker should be able to make up a suitable form if a decent sample is made available. If I had a bezel you would be welcome to borrow it. Sadly I do not. My buddy up in West Branch MI (Ron Hattner, N8UUH)  has one , maybe I can borrow his and get a pattern made up for you. I will try to speak with him this week end.

  Torches aren't a big issue when working mag alloys. We TIG and Oxy-Acetylene work it often. Wink

That would be fantastic if you can possibly do that....!

Anyone on the forum have any friends with a CNC machine? Grin
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WA1KBQ
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« Reply #68 on: March 20, 2011, 03:28:41 PM »

Congratulations on your recent SX-88 acquisition Len. Whether to restore or not as mentioned earlier in the thread is subject to one's personal views toward historical items but in my opinion the SX-88 should be restored to working order with a good appearance whenever possible. It appears you have a few challenges ahead with your's but basically you have a very good restorable receiver that should yield satisfactory results. I have restored four SX-88s so far and have just recently started on a fifth unit so have accumulated at least some practical experience in the process. I can offer some of the techniques I have found helpful so far.

The bezels were all potmetal with an inconsistent mixture of ingredients so some warped with environmental temperature and humidity changes but many did not. Any attempt to straighten yours will likely result in breakage as decomposed potmetal is very fragile and brittle. Early potmetal was the dross skimmed off the top from refining other metals. I would try to buy the CNC code from Dan Arney and make a few more. A word of caution is possibly in order here though. The original part was a casting and the design included a compound radius inside the picture frame. To accurately duplicate the appearance of the original part by machine you would have to have CNC 5-axis simultaneous capability. Dan's reproduction bezels were run on a 3-axis machining center and while pretty close to the original they do not feature the original part's compound radius in the picture frame inside corners. If you need a bezel they sure beat not having one though and Dan should be recognized for stepping up and making parts available and filling a genuine need.

Paint can be whatever you want it to be but for best appearance results the gray should be a flat gray and the silkscreened nomenclature should be an aged or antique white. You really don't want bright refrigerator white silkscreening on these but that is what most silkscreeners will put on if you don't specify. 

Three of the knobs you need are specific to the SX-88 which are the Band Selector, Response, and Band Width. You could use the SX-42 (or HT-32) Band Selector knob and ignore the nomenclature since it will not match your receiver. The Response and Band Width knobs could be made from  a standard AF/ RF gain knob with a 0-10 skirt with painting and renumbering. All others were used on other Halli models.

It looks like you have the dial pointers fixed already but all they are is brass rods soldered to each side of a brass disc. If the epoxy does not hold you can always solder them later.

Be sure to support the phone jack with a wire tie to the Response control shaft, the leads are solid core and will break away easily moving the chassis around. Not a big deal but saves unnecessary additional work.

This is a receiver that will require extensive recapping if top results are to be realized and you really don't want to disassemble it a second time to revisit things missed during the first attempt. In my experience besides all the plate and screen bypass caps (which are the most critical) you have silver mica tank caps inside each of the 1550/ 2075KC first IF transformers which if left unattended to will likely result in a steady barrage of static crashes and sizzling bacon sounds in the audio. You will also find lots of resistors have drifted far over the high end tolerance range that will need to be replaced. In my estimation an SX-88 receiver will not be ready for alignment unless you have replaced all capacitors in the 1st and 2nd RF stages and 2nd converter deck in addition to all 50KC IF stages and checked and replaced all resistors as necessary.

It is very common to find broken lugs on 50KC IF transformers T-12 and T-13 mounted on the left rear corner of the chassis. Due to the triangular shape of the side brace the chassis will easily roll over and fall before you can catch it when out of the cabinet and stood up on its side. I always remove the side braces anyway and often screw one or both back on backward to use them as temporary chassis stands. If you remove the nuts the IF can will slip off with the coil form left in place but be careful about the clip on top, you don't want to tear the thin bakelite coil form while pulling on the can. You will have to unsolder the lugs anyway to properly recap so you might as well remove the IF transformers anyway. The cans are made of .015 stamped aluminum and .015 aluminum sheet stock is readily available. I always disassemble all IF transformers to check for overheated windings anyway and this is a convenient time to repair any pulled lugs. Straighten the torn aluminum around the lug mounting hole and press flat. Cut a small square of .015 sheet aluminum, punch a hole for the rivet and epoxy to the inside of the can over the affected area, use a C-clamp. When cured I re-rivet the lug to the can but small hardware of the appropriate size would work just as well. Be very careful with those threaded ferrite slugs as they are irreplaceable. Make a proper adjusting tool according to the directions in the instruction manual and don't be tempted to use something that seems to fit. The ferrite on top of the slugs is very thin and will break if the slug is tight and the appropriate tool that fits correctly is not used.

If the previous owner had the 2nd converter sub-chassis off you should see evidence of removed wire leads, there are about 12 of them and access to some is very restricted. Without proper equipment it is difficult to achieve professional looking results removing and reinstalling them and many SX-88s out there right now look like they have obviously been apart.

Regards, Greg
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WA1KBQ
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« Reply #69 on: March 20, 2011, 04:21:23 PM »

SX-88 Serial #400 currently in process:

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20400/SX88-40023.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20400/SX88-40027.jpg
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WA1KBQ
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« Reply #70 on: March 20, 2011, 04:31:21 PM »

A brief picture history of other recent SX-88 restoration work:

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3178.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3198.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/444-007.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/444-021.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/444-008.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/446-022.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-009.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-010.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-011.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-012.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-026.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-022.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-023.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-024.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/444-025.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3075.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3076.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3085.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3091.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3099.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3183.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m191/wa1kbq/SX%2088%20-%20444/IMG_3182.jpg
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n2len
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« Reply #71 on: March 20, 2011, 09:57:33 PM »

Congratulations on your recent SX-88 acquisition Len. Whether to restore or not as mentioned earlier in the thread is subject to one's personal views toward historical items but in my opinion the SX-88 should be restored to working order with a good appearance whenever possible. It appears you have a few challenges ahead with your's but basically you have a very good restorable receiver that should yield satisfactory results. I have restored four SX-88s so far and have just recently started on a fifth unit so have accumulated at least some practical experience in the process. I can offer some of the techniques I have found helpful so far.

The bezels were all potmetal with an inconsistent mixture of ingredients so some warped with environmental temperature and humidity changes but many did not. Any attempt to straighten yours will likely result in breakage as decomposed potmetal is very fragile and brittle. Early potmetal was the dross skimmed off the top from refining other metals. I would try to buy the CNC code from Dan Arney and make a few more. A word of caution is possibly in order here though. The original part was a casting and the design included a compound radius inside the picture frame. To accurately duplicate the appearance of the original part by machine you would have to have CNC 5-axis simultaneous capability. Dan's reproduction bezels were run on a 3-axis machining center and while pretty close to the original they do not feature the original part's compound radius in the picture frame inside corners. If you need a bezel they sure beat not having one though and Dan should be recognized for stepping up and making parts available and filling a genuine need.

Paint can be whatever you want it to be but for best appearance results the gray should be a flat gray and the silkscreened nomenclature should be an aged or antique white. You really don't want bright refrigerator white silkscreening on these but that is what most silkscreeners will put on if you don't specify.  

Three of the knobs you need are specific to the SX-88 which are the Band Selector, Response, and Band Width. You could use the SX-42 (or HT-32) Band Selector knob and ignore the nomenclature since it will not match your receiver. The Response and Band Width knobs could be made from  a standard AF/ RF gain knob with a 0-10 skirt with painting and renumbering. All others were used on other Halli models.

It looks like you have the dial pointers fixed already but all they are is brass rods soldered to each side of a brass disc. If the epoxy does not hold you can always solder them later.

Be sure to support the phone jack with a wire tie to the Response control shaft, the leads are solid core and will break away easily moving the chassis around. Not a big deal but saves unnecessary additional work.

This is a receiver that will require extensive recapping if top results are to be realized and you really don't want to disassemble it a second time to revisit things missed during the first attempt. In my experience besides all the plate and screen bypass caps (which are the most critical) you have silver mica tank caps inside each of the 1550/ 2075KC first IF transformers which if left unattended to will likely result in a steady barrage of static crashes and sizzling bacon sounds in the audio. You will also find lots of resistors have drifted far over the high end tolerance range that will need to be replaced. In my estimation an SX-88 receiver will not be ready for alignment unless you have replaced all capacitors in the 1st and 2nd RF stages and 2nd converter deck in addition to all 50KC IF stages and checked and replaced all resistors as necessary.

It is very common to find broken lugs on 50KC IF transformers T-12 and T-13 mounted on the left rear corner of the chassis. Due to the triangular shape of the side brace the chassis will easily roll over and fall before you can catch it when out of the cabinet and stood up on its side. I always remove the side braces anyway and often screw one or both back on backward to use them as temporary chassis stands. If you remove the nuts the IF can will slip off with the coil form left in place but be careful about the clip on top, you don't want to tear the thin bakelite coil form while pulling on the can. You will have to unsolder the lugs anyway to properly recap so you might as well remove the IF transformers anyway. The cans are made of .015 stamped aluminum and .015 aluminum sheet stock is readily available. I always disassemble all IF transformers to check for overheated windings anyway and this is a convenient time to repair any pulled lugs. Straighten the torn aluminum around the lug mounting hole and press flat. Cut a small square of .015 sheet aluminum, punch a hole for the rivet and epoxy to the inside of the can over the affected area, use a C-clamp. When cured I re-rivet the lug to the can but small hardware of the appropriate size would work just as well. Be very careful with those threaded ferrite slugs as they are irreplaceable. Make a proper adjusting tool according to the directions in the instruction manual and don't be tempted to use something that seems to fit. The ferrite on top of the slugs is very thin and will break if the slug is tight and the appropriate tool that fits correctly is not used.

If the previous owner had the 2nd converter sub-chassis off you should see evidence of removed wire leads, there are about 12 of them and access to some is very restricted. Without proper equipment it is difficult to achieve professional looking results removing and reinstalling them and many SX-88s out there right now look like they have obviously been apart.

Regards, Greg

Hey Greg, I just got home.....
Thank you kindly for you very detailed response. It is very much appreciated! I agree with your thoughts on restoration. What I have done so far is repair some items recognized after the front panel was removed.
Electrically the receiver is in good working condition. As the pictures show, some of the larger capacitors were already changed. Cosmetically, I was very lucky to locate a NOS replica bezel that came from a lot done by Dan Arney several years ago. Over the entire week, I reached out to many people regarding the bezel and drive belt. But I owe a great deal too: Gary Harmon Jr. What a nice gent! The guys here on the forum, I can't begin to thank everyone! He could hear my passion to get this jewel back looking fine! What I would like to do, at the time I receive the bezel, I would like to make a blue print or mold or whatever needed to be able to make a replica. I am not in this for the money, just to offer the information to anyone that may in the future need a replacement as I do. I also located someone who began the project of getting the drive belt copied. He has the all the measurements needed and a company that was able to actually produce it. The price to produce was quite high, so I may need to investigate another manufacturer once the information is provided to me. Again, not for the money, I'm sure that many SX-88 owners would want an extra belt.

Thank you for your additional insight on how Dan's bezel were made.
Regarding T-12 and T-13, what I did was use JB KwiK to reattach the rivets on the left side.
I don't believe that the coils were broken, however, I may in the future completely remove them if I decide to
do a complete ground up restore. I think that the JB weld will remove if needed. Your process on the IF cans, should be one for the book. Please supply me with some pictures of the IF can repair if you have them. Can you supply me with a place to purchase the proper alignment tool for the IF can adjustment?

I don't believe that the sub-chassis has been restored. I need to remove the cover and take a peek inside. I don't have the proper soldering tools for wire removal. Don't worry Greg, I didn't tell you yet, but my SX-88 will be your 6th renovation! Grin

Greg, thank you so much for those pictures. I've seen some nice restoration work, however those SX-88 pictures are truly amazing! Something to be PROUD of!
I love the way you break it all down to the ground, clean, polish then re-build it all back up.
I am curious to ask if you have over 100 bench hours in the restoration shown?

What a beaut!
I'm sure #400 will be the same. I love the way the panels and metal boxes came out.
What do you use to treat the metal?
Is it a step by step process?

The front panel is going to be restored by Bob W0YVA in the near future. I'm on the hunt for an SX42 as well for the knobs.

Again, Thanks for everything!


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n2len
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« Reply #72 on: March 20, 2011, 10:03:40 PM »


How about #203 after #400.
 Grin
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kg8lb
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« Reply #73 on: March 21, 2011, 11:52:09 AM »

http://www.wmberg.com/

http://www.sdp-si.com/press/New/Belts2_5.htm

https://sdp-si.com/eStore/Direct.asp?GroupID=213
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n2len
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« Reply #74 on: April 17, 2011, 07:54:02 PM »

First off I want to thank everyone who has offered assistance with the restoration of my SX-88 #203.
Soon, the front panel will be completed and sent back.
I haven't received the replica bezel yet, hopefully soon. I am still looking for the knobs...

However, I would like to share some thoughts, and am seeking advice on my next project.
Where and how to begin...It's dirty, some chassis rust, corrosion, etc....


I just acquired my second Hallicrafters SX-88.

I haven't received it yet!

This very rare bird is Prototype #2.

<snip> from original sale...

"Here is the rarest of the rare in SX-88's.  It is engineering prototype #2.  Chuck Dachis in the 2nd edition of his excellent "Radios By Hallicrafters" book describes his prototype of this receiver.  This one isn't quite as crude as his but has some of the same features.  The chassis is cold rolled steel with scribe marks marking some of the tube sockets.  It has the extra tube and i.f. can on the second converter sub-chassis.  There is no data plate on the rear panel and there are no holes drilled for one.  The "#2" is marked with orange crayon in several places on the chassis as you can see on the photos.  It looks like several people have gotten into this receiver at one time or another.  The original wiring is typical cotten covered wire as used by Hallicrafters.  The mods were later plastic covered wire.  Some of the wires are not hooked up, so the receiver is not operational.  All of the paper capacitors and some resistors have been replaced.  I have not attempted to plug it in as I don't know what would happen!  It came out of an estate in California several years ago.  I have not tried to clean it up as I didn't want to disturb the crayon markings.  The front panel is very good, but the original tuning knobs have been replaced by later Hallicrafters knobs.  All of the internal covers as well as the cabinet are missing.  Possibly other Hallicrafters cabinets might fit it.  It was rack mounted with some teletype gear when I got it. It has the original drive belt for the bandswitch, and the front bezel is not warped.  My less than perfect eyesight and shaking hands keeps me from trying to bring this great piece of history back to life.  I'll leave that to more capable hands than mine!  There doesn't seem to be anything missing other than the covers and cabinet."

<unsnip>

So,
Does anyone have experience with FILTH, DIRT, RUST etc....

Amazing that the front panel is in very nice shape, the original bezel is perfect, 99% original knobs, the drive belt is perfect....
I can easily part it out and cosmetically fully restore my other SX-88.
I don't want to do that.....

Some pictures to follow.....




* proto2frontpanel.jpg (97.39 KB, 640x480 - viewed 1076 times.)

* proto2front.jpg (102.23 KB, 640x480 - viewed 1071 times.)

* proto2bottom.jpg (123.4 KB, 640x480 - viewed 1027 times.)
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