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They're bringing back Schlitz!




 
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Author Topic: They're bringing back Schlitz!  (Read 29086 times)
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ka3zlr
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« Reply #50 on: August 08, 2008, 06:28:39 AM »

If i had Stock in Bud for all the money i spent on that I'd be retired by now....ah well that's then...

How about Homemade Wine any one perken any...?
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K3ZS
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« Reply #51 on: August 08, 2008, 09:38:18 AM »

Back in the 80's I had my first taste of real beer from a microbrewery.   I started making my own after that since all you could buy around here was the usual American style beer.   Rather than making it completely from scratch, I bought the premade malt syrup with brewer's yeast.   Following the directions on the can yielded a weak tasting beer not much better that the bought beer.    I found a web site from a homemade beer maker that told you how to really make it.    Basically it said use one pound of malt (either dry or syrup) per gallon of water.    I used a lager malt syrup with an equal weight of dark dry malt (like used for Guiness and other true dark beers), five pounds for five gallons.   Dry hopped it with Hollertau hops.   Also you must use little corn sugar (not table sugar) in each bottle for secondary fermentation.    Leaving some air space in each bottle after capping so they don't blow up, after six weeks it was the best beer I ever tasted.    Some friends also said the same thing.   Since then a new beer distributor started carrying foreign and microbrew beer, I buy that now by the case.
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k4kyv
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Don
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« Reply #52 on: August 08, 2008, 10:21:34 AM »


Cleanliness is FB but  condemning pork out of hand hardly fits any hygienic principles that I know of today.

How about not frying a steak in the same pan that had a drop of milk in it ten years ago?

Trichinosis is a parasitic disease caused by eating raw or undercooked pork.  They didn't understand the technical details in those days, so they simply shunned pork altogether, and it evolved into a religious and culturally based taboo that continues to this day, despite the knowledge we have gained since then.  Moslems also are directed to avoid pork.

I'm not sure of the origin of the taboo of mixing meat with dairy products.  Although some of those old beliefs originated from valid health precautions, I'm sure a lot of pure superstition got thrown in.  2500 years ago there was little if any distinction between science and superstition.

It's like Southern Baptists and Islamists, regarding alcohol.  There are clearly known dangers to overindulgence, but that sensible precaution has led to a provision in the prescribed belief system, that touching one drop is enough to condemn a person irrevocably to burn in hell fire for all of eternity.
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

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This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
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K9ACT
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« Reply #53 on: August 08, 2008, 12:39:00 PM »



Moslems also are directed to avoid pork.


As a born-again Atheist, I am an equal opportunity heckler and wasn't picking on any particular religion.

I was just challenging the assertion that because the German Purity Law was from 1600, it is meaningless.

Translating to "purity" aside, it prevents compliant brewers from including any of the 100 or more "additives" used by not-so compliant brewers.  Someone just mentioned formaldahyde as a great example in addition to my pet peeve which is corn syrup instead of malt.

js

 
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W1QWT
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« Reply #54 on: August 10, 2008, 04:06:59 PM »

Bringing back Schlitz eh! This is begining to be a trip down beer nostalgia road. Wonder if it is because the marketing types figure there is a big market of baby boomers who cut their teeth on these products.
I was in the 'packie' yesterday picking up my bottle of wine. Since my heart surgery I've been having a glass of wine a few times aweek instead of lots of beer.
Well they had a table set up and were having beer tasting with Narragansett beer. So I took a taste and immediately was flooded with memories. All my old beer neurons were firing!
The man told me that  Narragansett is now back and under new owners who are brewing it like the old stuff complete with water from Scituate RI. I told him that I remember my buddies in 1961 stealing GIQ's off the beer delivery truck and then we would go to the swimming hole to enjoy the summer day. Nothing like a sunny day, cool water, and cold beer! We were just young 13 year old miscreants!
So I took some home with me and I am enjoying it right now.
Ah Pabst, Narragansett, Schlitz, Carling Black Lable, and Ballantine!
 Regards
Q
W1QWT
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W8EJO
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« Reply #55 on: August 10, 2008, 04:40:25 PM »

I'm long past Schlitz.

Can no longer drink Bud, Miller, Coors, etc., however I do have my favorites.

Favorite breweries/beers:
#1) GREAT DIVIDE BREWERY, Denver, CO
A) Hibernation Ale 8.1% ABV
B) Yeti Stout 9.5% ABV
C) Hercules Double IPA 9.1% ABV

None of these brews are for the faint of heart but if taste is whats important to you then go for it.  I have found none tastier.

#2) Bell's Brewery, Kalamazoo, MI
A) Bell's Porter
B) Kalamazoo Stout
C) Two Hearted Ale (A double IPA named after Michigan's UP Two Hearted River made famous by Ernest Hemingway in his short story (Big Two Hearted River)

#3) Rogue Brewer, Newport, OR
A) Shakespeare Stout
B) Mocha Porter

#4) Dogfish Head Brewery, Milton, DE
A) 90- Minute IPA 9.0% ABV (very similar to Great Divide's Hercules Double IPA)
B) World Wide Stout  18% ABV (This is the biggest brew I've ever had. 
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Terry, W8EJO

Freedom and liberty - extremist ideas since 1776.
k4kyv
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Don
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« Reply #56 on: August 10, 2008, 06:02:43 PM »

Well they had a table set up and were having beer tasting with Narragansett beer. So I took a taste and immediately was flooded with memories. All my old beer neurons were firing!
The man told me that  Narragansett is now back and under new owners who are brewing it like the old stuff complete with water from Scituate RI. I told him that I remember my buddies in 1961 stealing GIQ's off the beer delivery truck and then we would go to the swimming hole to enjoy the summer day. Nothing like a sunny day, cool water, and cold beer! We were just young 13 year old miscreants!
So I took some home with me and I am enjoying it right now.
Ah Pabst, Narragansett, Schlitz, Carling Black Lable, and Ballantine!

Do they still sell Knickerbocker in the Northeast?
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

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This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
KA1ZGC
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« Reply #57 on: August 10, 2008, 09:39:49 PM »

Schlitz hasn't been gone all that long.

Back in the early-mid '90s when the "ice" beer trend was sweeping the continent, I was stocking shelves at a Shaw's supermarket in Waterville, ME to pay the bills (don't try this at home). The overnight shift ended at 8:00 AM, and we'd all take a walk down Beer Avenue to grab our favorite swill to haul out into the parking lot and drink with our manager (completely against company policy, of course, so we weren't shy about whipping out the 811s while we were at it).

At least three full doors of the cooler were the "ice" beers, with more brands showing up every day.* I used to joke with my co-workers how funny it would be if we one day saw "Schlitz Ice" in that section of the cooler (as nobody had seen a Schlitz can in quite some time), we'd all have a good chuckle, then go get drunk.

Imagine the look on my face when one day I saw a plain blue twelve-pack box with the familiar red bow-tie and the word "ICE" underneath it in white block letters.

Don't look at me like that, I'm not making this up.

Satire and reality were colliding right before my very eyes. I almost bought it just to keep as evidence, but figured my money was better directed towards something I'd actually want to drink.

Speaking of "ice" beers, the one cheap buzz that I do enjoy is Molson Ice. Not so much for the flavor (it tastes slightly less skunk-pissy than Heineken) but for the alcohol content: 5.6%.** Some of my shack pics in the gallery bear this out.

I'm willing to bet that whatever you find with the Schlitz label is likely spillage from your local big-name brewery, just as there's no "Mad Dog" region of California.

--Thom
Killer Agony One Zipper Got Caught

* The one that convinced me that America has gone entirely to the auspices of extremely stupid people was "Coors Artic Ice". Why? Look at the spelling, that's exactly the way they spelled it. Someone must have eventually caught on, because they stopped distributing it altogether just a few months after it was introduced. I hope Coors lost a fortune on that one.

** Someone stated the "malt liquor" cutoff was 5.5%, that's inaccurate. You can acheive 5.6% without distillation, which is what determines a beer vs. a malt liquor.
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K9ACT
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« Reply #58 on: August 11, 2008, 12:56:09 AM »


** Someone stated the "malt liquor" cutoff was 5.5%, that's inaccurate. You can acheive 5.6% without distillation, which is what determines a beer vs. a malt liquor.[/size][/i]

It's not a question of what one can do.  You can make 10% beer without distillation if you work at it.

It a question of taxes.  Big Brother just found another way to add a new tax. Malt Liquor is taxed at a rate between beer and spirits.  Aren't they clever?

But so are the breweries.  Guess where that extra alcohol comes from?

They remove it from the non-alcoholic line and put it into the malt liquor line.  No coincidence that they all make both.  No still involved at all.

Sort of like the dairies promoting low fat milk so that can sell the cream at a premium.

js
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KA1ZGC
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« Reply #59 on: August 11, 2008, 02:41:53 AM »

It's not a question of what one can do.  You can make 10% beer without distillation if you work at it.

It a question of taxes.  Big Brother just found another way to add a new tax. Malt Liquor is taxed at a rate between beer and spirits.  Aren't they clever?

They sure like to think so, but you and I know better.

My point was that 5.5% is not the correct number. What I drink is 5.6%, clearly labeled "beer" (the words "malt liquor" don't appear anywhere on any of the labels), and that's been the case for the 15 or so years they've been squeezing the stuff out (the fact that it's "Canadian" doesn't apply, since it's bottled and distributed here).

I know why they do it (I'm sure someone along the line used the catchphrase "for The Children"), but that's a seperate issue.

--Thom
Killer Aircraft One Zeppelin Goes Crash
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K9ACT
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« Reply #60 on: August 11, 2008, 09:44:51 AM »



My point was that 5.5% is not the correct number. What I drink is 5.6%, clearly labeled "beer" (the words "malt liquor" don't appear anywhere on any of the labels), and that's been the case for the 15 or so years they've been squeezing the stuff out (the fact that it's "Canadian" doesn't apply, since it's bottled and distributed here).


Ah, but the fact that it's made in Canada might.  I have never seen alcohol content on a beer label so it must be a Canadian thing.

I stand corrected if the number is 5.6 instead of 5.5%.

>I know why they do it (I'm sure someone along the line used the catchphrase "for The Children"), but that's a seperate issue.

Yes, the "chirren" but it's ok to teach them to masterbate.

js

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KA1ZGC
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« Reply #61 on: August 11, 2008, 01:46:05 PM »

My point was that 5.5% is not the correct number. What I drink is 5.6%, clearly labeled "beer" (the words "malt liquor" don't appear anywhere on any of the labels), and that's been the case for the 15 or so years they've been squeezing the stuff out (the fact that it's "Canadian" doesn't apply, since it's bottled and distributed here).


Ah, but the fact that it's made in Canada might.  I have never seen alcohol content on a beer label so it must be a Canadian thing.

Odds are they brew it here, too. Wouldn't make much sense to brew it in Canada and truck it here just to bottle and distribute it.

It would all depend on whether the law is written to cover beers brewed here or beers sold here, not unlike "export" models of CB amplifiers sold here in the States that the FCC busts retailers for on a routine basis.

I know why they do it (I'm sure someone along the line used the catchphrase "for The Children"), but that's a seperate issue.

Yes, the "chirren" but it's ok to teach them to [masturbate].

Not sure I want to touch that (no pun intended), but in my day instructions weren't necessary.
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K9ACT
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« Reply #62 on: August 11, 2008, 08:39:33 PM »


Odds are they brew it here, too. Wouldn't make much sense to brew it in Canada and truck it here just to bottle and distribute it.


Consider what Coors does/did. They ship what they called "beer concentrate" from the land of "mountain spring water" in railroad tank cars to the East Coast.  When it arrives at the East Coast "brewery", they add local ditch water, bottle it and call it Coors Lite.

>It would all depend on whether the law is written to cover beers brewed here or beers sold here..

The law is written to maximize tax revenue.  Sort of like raising cigarette tax to discourage smoking.  They can claim they are doing it for the "chirren" but they also destroy villages to save them.

js


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KA1ZGC
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« Reply #63 on: August 12, 2008, 11:41:37 AM »

It would all depend on whether the law is written to cover beers brewed here or beers sold here..

The law is written to maximize tax revenue.  Sort of like raising cigarette tax to discourage smoking.  They can claim they are doing it for the "chirren" but they also destroy villages to save them.

Apples and oranges, Jack. You missed the point entirely.

I give up.
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k3sqp
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« Reply #64 on: August 12, 2008, 03:08:41 PM »

In the wide weird world of beer classification..
The Beer family tree has 2 branches based on type of yeast, "top
fermenting ( ales wheat beers stout , porter, IPA, Belgian and even spontaneously
femented ( Lambic et al)
    "Bottom fermenting" All lager types including Pilsner, Bock , Marzen and
last but not least American Malt Liquor.
   In this list the  ABV varies from Berliner Weisse at 2.5 to 3 % to
Barley Wines, Old Ales and Double Bocks at  12.5 to 15.0 + ABV.
    Alcoholic strength varies because of the legal requirements of various
countries and in the US, by various states...
     But as always, alcoholic strength is not a measure of quality...

Frank
K3 San Quentin Prison
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