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What Type of Switch is This?




 
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Todd, KA1KAQ
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« on: March 27, 2017, 10:38:55 AM »

I've got some old Fostoria shop lights that I'm going to use in the new station project. One has a broken switch (missing bat, actually) that needs replacing. See attached photo.

I realize I could use any old toggle or twist switch here, but this type of switch works well and doesn't require grabbing onto the light or switch to operate it. Just push or pull it sideways with a bit of pressure until it clicks.

Usually these things have a name (other than Ken or Charlie) like a Burndy connector or a Cinch Jones plug or similar. I've searched high and low with zero luck in finding that info. No doubt knowing what I'm looking for would make it an easier, faster search.

Anyone know what type of switch this is or, better still - anyone have a case of replacement switches in their garage or basement? I only need one, but spares are a good thing.

 


* Fostoria switch.JPG (192.74 KB, 1600x1200 - viewed 61 times.)
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WD8BIL
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2017, 02:18:26 PM »

It's a simple pull switch, you know, like the kind in your basement with a chain!
It's just terminated with that neat little button handle. A pull straight up should work too.

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Patrick J. / KD5OEI
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2017, 07:21:13 PM »

It's a simple pull switch, you know, like the kind in your basement with a chain!
It's just terminated with that neat little button handle. A pull straight up should work too.



Seconded. A quite short chain and the handle is held by chain pressure against the body so it sticks out when unmolested. With care a ballchain pull switch should be fine fitted to that application.
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Todd, KA1KAQ
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« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2017, 09:15:05 AM »

It's a simple pull switch, you know, like the kind in your basement with a chain!
It's just terminated with that neat little button handle. A pull straight up should work too.

True, but I'm looking for a replacement switch with the bakelite bat handle on it and trying to identify the type or manufacturer. The little loop inside that the bat hooks to is actually hot, so when you pull it up you need something to keep it away from the metal sides of the body or *ZAP* - out go the lights. Already went that route.  Wink

It looks like the switch is built into the socket housing. Guess I need to pull it apart and perhaps then a manufacturer or other info will become apparent. All the searching I've done has come to nothing. Very old, cool lights on mechanical arms, will be perfect in the station.
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« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2017, 11:10:27 AM »

It's a simple pull switch, you know, like the kind in your basement with a chain!
It's just terminated with that neat little button handle. A pull straight up should work too.

True, but I'm looking for a replacement switch with the bakelite bat handle on it and trying to identify the type or manufacturer. The little loop inside that the bat hooks to is actually hot, so when you pull it up you need something to keep it away from the metal sides of the body or *ZAP* - out go the lights. Already went that route.  Wink

It looks like the switch is built into the socket housing. Guess I need to pull it apart and perhaps then a manufacturer or other info will become apparent. All the searching I've done has come to nothing. Very old, cool lights on mechanical arms, will be perfect in the station.

Todd, 
Looks like a very tough find. 

I know its not the same, but I think it would look pretty good is one of the twist type light switches.  The twist part is about the same size as the toggle handle but you would simply twist it to turn the light either on or off.  The body of those type of switches are pretty small so hopefully there is room inside for it.  The twist part is typically black or brown in color.  Other than that, if all you need is the toggle handle part, maybe a machinist with a lath could custom make you a part.

Joe-GMS
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Todd, KA1KAQ
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2017, 12:12:12 PM »

What I'll likely end up doing is finding a beat up/partial lamp assembly on ebay or somewhere with a good switch/socket and just swap it. I like the particular action of this type switch, handy and quick. Plus, I've got a pair of them so the good one will get hung up with the temporary peanut whistle station for now.
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