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#40 Shop Talk - Wafer switch cleaning tips




 
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Author Topic: #40 Shop Talk - Wafer switch cleaning tips  (Read 5528 times)
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kc4umo
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« on: March 26, 2016, 08:44:26 PM »



This site has helped me quite a few times in the past so thought I would share a little tip with the good folks here. Many of you may already know this but some may not.


In this video we look at several types of wafer switches. We then look at a method I use to clean these switches and bring them back to life. These switches are in many types of equipment. Lets look at what  we can do to repair these.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9viOArsegIs
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WA2SQQ
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2016, 09:24:31 PM »

Great video, thanks. Used the cleaning solution on a Lafayette HA600 I'm restoring.
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kc4umo
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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2016, 09:32:03 PM »

Great video, thanks. Used the cleaning solution on a Lafayette HA600 I'm restoring.

Thank you Robert.  It is a very good cheap solution to make and does an outstanding job. Plus it is safe to you and the environment.
I had many folks contact me about this  and is why I did this video.
Thanks for watching.
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N9axl
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2016, 02:47:47 AM »

I just tried this on my Viking 2. Worked like a charm. In my case since I didn't want to remove the switches I used some small hobby paint brushes. Worked great. Thanks.
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kc4umo
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2016, 08:13:09 AM »

I just tried this on my Viking 2. Worked like a charm. In my case since I didn't want to remove the switches I used some small hobby paint brushes. Worked great. Thanks.

Good deal, that works too. Thanks for watching.
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WBear2GCR
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« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2016, 09:18:52 PM »

The vinegar + salt also works well on rust, fyi.
Don't think the neutralizing solution (baking soda) needs to be that concentrated, since the Vinegar solution is weak (weak acid). Since I skimmed the very long video, not sure if he made clear, after the neutralizating, the parts need to be rinsed thoroughly in water... also the wafer switches don't really need to be disassembled, you could dunk the whole thing, up to the detent/bushing assembly, and maybe even that too...

I'd almost never use WD-40 on any switch.
certainly not on the contacts.
Deoxit and/or Stabilant are better choices for contacts.

Afaik, WD-40 and other light petroleum lubes are really NG for phenolic.
For other lube requirements I prefer to put smaller amounts of lube, of the best type for that duty
precisely where it needs to go (if that's do-able).

To dry the parts, not WD-40, hot air. A hair dryer is more than good enough.

Other than this, the guy seems to be a pretty good tech! Cheesy Some of his other vids look interesting,
I think I'll watch a few and see...

                        _-_-
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kc4umo
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2016, 05:13:27 AM »

The vinegar + salt also works well on rust, fyi.
Don't think the neutralizing solution (baking soda) needs to be that concentrated, since the Vinegar solution is weak (weak acid). Since I skimmed the very long video, not sure if he made clear, after the neutralizating, the parts need to be rinsed thoroughly in water... also the wafer switches don't really need to be disassembled, you could dunk the whole thing, up to the detent/bushing assembly, and maybe even that too...

Yep, also great for cleaning connectors like on lawn equipment ect.
Yes the vinegar is weak, but there is high salt content, the distilled water  baking soda helps get rid of it.
Disassembly of the switch was for video purposes only. But sometimes you have to take them apart to repair spring contacts.
Thanks for your feed back.

Quote
I'd almost never use WD-40 on any switch.
certainly not on the contacts.
Deoxit and/or Stabilant are better choices for contacts.


Afaik, WD-40 and other light petroleum lubes are really NG for phenolic.
For other lube requirements I prefer to put smaller amounts of lube, of the best type for that duty
precisely where it needs to go (if that's do-able).

To dry the parts, not WD-40, hot air. A hair dryer is more than good enough.


WD-40 should never be used as a lubricant. Only use it to remove water from parts.
And yes hot air like mentioned in the video is the best was to dry parts.
I agree with you.


Quote
Other than this, the guy seems to be a pretty good tech! Cheesy Some of his other vids look interesting,
I think I'll watch a few and see...

                        _-_-
Not sure how good of a tech he is, but the redneck in the video is myself.  Smiley
Thanks for watching and for your feed back.
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WBear2GCR
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2016, 08:58:25 AM »

Well, getcher self up here and fix some stuff!!   Roll Eyes   Undecided

If you put WD-40 on those switches then if it were me, I'd have to remove the WD-40 before
installing. WD-40 does not evaporate. You could remove the water by dipping in alcohol, fwiw.

Go for the hair dryer route.

Cheesy

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WA2SQQ
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« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2016, 10:17:06 AM »

FYI, I used liberal Deoxit on the phonelic switches in my HQ180. The switch swelled and got rather tight. In time it dried out and apparently no permanent damage.
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WBear2GCR
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« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2016, 11:56:13 AM »

Hmmm... not good, the swelling of the phenolic.

best keep it to the contacts somehow, I guess...
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kc4umo
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2016, 12:14:40 PM »

I hate it when the phenolic swells.
As soon as you get that stuff wet grab a hair dryer as the Bear suggested
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Todd, KA1KAQ
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« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2016, 02:47:49 PM »

I had this happen with my SX-28A years many years ago, and it froze the switch up for a while. That older, dark brown phenolic is very porous. Still turns rather hard, needs to be cleaned with alcohol to remove it completely. Thought I was careful applying the DeOxit, apparently not careful enough.

WD-40 works well for some things, but certainly isn't a cure-all. I've posted before about using it basically as a hose to clean gears on the R-390 receivers, SP-600s and similar when you find one that is really nasty. Works great for that and other temporary situations. It was never meant as a lubricant, WD = Water Displacement. The vast majority of what comes out evaporates pretty quickly and the remaining film doesn't hang around long, either. This stuff was originally formulated to keep Atlas missiles from crudding up in their silos due to condensation.
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WA2SQQ
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« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2016, 03:17:37 PM »

Spoke to a WD40 rep at a trade show. He told me the biggest problem they have is when people use it on auto locks. The immediate assumption is how it loosens them up. In a short time they get real stiff, as you've actually washed out all the lubricant. WD40 followed by some liquid graphite is what he recommended. WD40 works great for removing gummy labels and cleaning up wiring. I personally like the smell! :-)
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VE3LYX
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« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2016, 03:55:53 PM »

"I personally like the smell"
I tell ya he was so high he could have gone duck huntin with a rake!"
WD40 has its place but as noted it is not a lubricant nor a loosen all.
donVe3LYX
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kc4umo
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« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2016, 04:34:51 PM »

Spoke to a WD40 rep at a trade show. He told me the biggest problem they have is when people use it on auto locks. The immediate assumption is how it loosens them up. In a short time they get real stiff, as you've actually washed out all the lubricant. WD40 followed by some liquid graphite is what he recommended. WD40 works great for removing gummy labels and cleaning up wiring. I personally like the smell! :-)

Agreed. Why I explained that in the video at 22:40.
WD-40 is great for removing water. Not as a lubricant.
I used to like the smell until I worked at Firestone. We had 55 gallon drums of the stuff everywhere. It was used for cleaning the mixing machines. Seems I smelled like the stuff for weeks.
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KD6VXI
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« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2016, 05:13:05 PM »

WD40.

Designed to Displace Water,  formula 40.  From military jeeps.

Anything else should be considered an off label use. 

--Shane
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W1RKW
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« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2016, 04:29:26 PM »

I like burning WD40.
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Bob
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