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What is the feelings on Wide Band SSB




 
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Jack-KA3ZLR-
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« on: February 26, 2005, 09:45:21 PM »

Evening all,

 I have been monitoring 17 meters as of late and I am finding quite a few stations on the verge of some very Wide Amplitude. I don't record and i don't tell But i do see and increase in this area.

 I understand fully some of these newer rigs have some Variableness to them and have I guess what is considered "Options" built in. Now again i'll reiterate  my policy is I don't ask and i don't tell, but isn't this taking a risk of some sort.

 I would venture a guess that this is becoming Acceptable practice Now..? Or is it becoming a Hands off till a complaint is founded...?

 I am wondering about this..
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W8ER
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2005, 12:00:42 AM »

Jack .. this is an excellent question .. especially in light of the FCC comments regarding bandwidth rules. I really don't think the FCC meant to sound like they were giving a green light to rolling out bandwidth but it appears that it is being interpreted that way.

Education is going to be the only answer to not letting this get completely out of hand. Education for both camps, the senders "oh yeah", and the guys who piss and moan about them. While it's quieter now, I think you can expect the problem to rear it's head again in a major way. I am appaled at the pervasive misconceptions about bandwidth and the lack of knowledge displayed about where you are really transmitting and where you are really listening!

Take all of that in to account and then listen to 3865 where guys running legal limit sometimes discuss technical topics like how to determine the positive pin on a DC relay coil, when it is not marked. Caw mawn! Edumication's the answer! But how?

--Larry W8ER
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W2VW
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2005, 12:57:20 AM »

Hi Jack,

   A good friend of mine who has been a ham for the last 66 years has an interesting slant on this. He says that anything that drives interest in radio and experimentation with radio is a good thing. Instead of everyone just getting on the internet, maybe something will interest people enough to do things with radio. I don't think he really gives 2 cents about good sounding ssb either. Oh yeah, he is also friends with most of the 14178 gang. One for about 65 years. Always a blast to hear those folks on the air at the same time.
   Me personally? I'd rather hear some ssb guy 4 or 5 KHz wide on purpose from using a wide filter or DSP setting than from an overdriven amplifier or pumping P.O.S. ALC loop. Some of these guys have really done some great stuff. I have a quality 3.1 KHz filter here for ssb and am quite satisfied with the 3050 Hz bandwidth which it gives me.
    Great hobby ham radio. With our populace dying off daily, maybe some can  enjoyment out of things which are not cookie cutter design. This is amateur radio.
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nq5t
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2005, 01:00:03 AM »

I have no problem with it, subject to the rules regarding interference,  and just plain common courtesy.  If the band isn't crowded, why not?

Many of our AM brethren think nothing of transmitting a 16 Khz wide signal if the band conditions and occupancy can accommodate it (and sometimes, when it can't), so what's the diff??

Grant/NQ5T
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Jack-KA3ZLR-
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2005, 04:55:58 AM »

Morning Guys,

 My stand has always been, Experiment and learn keeps the interest alive.

 But i actually ran into two really Sharp fellas here and I sat back in the chair and monitored, I piped off the if to the spectrum analyzer and spoted a coupla spectrographs on the computer, and the conversation was very interesting, Rich in technique, and how to do this and that and pipping into the balanced modulators and carrier point movement, what rig does what and the how tos, and I sat there and thought I got a couple of young fellas on the move here and are very Sharp...I like this...

 Like i'm saying though if this Fine, I'm fine with it, just a question on the group think here and how we feel about it...

 My concern is basically for them, the entire qso was within all regs and proper procedures operation wise, and they were considerate for breakins and so forth...when i run into these guys and watch them in action to me that's good ham radio...

 But ya never know when some body decides to write a letter and the next thing  ya know there's flowers in the mail wanting to know who and what did such and such on this frequency and are you in parameters..that's the thing and then it ruins the experience for them...is my concern...

It was a Good qso...
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w3jn
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2005, 09:51:18 AM »

I agree 100% with APEman.  I do wish, however, that some of these guys would realize that just increasing bass does NOT equal a pleasant sound.  For whatever reason, some have VERY irritating high IMD at low frequencies - perhaps due to insufficient opposite sideband supression, or inadequate carrier rejection, or poor DSP algorithms.

WHatever the cause, they need to cut their bass boost drastically.

73 John
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WA1HZK
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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2005, 02:19:02 PM »

Anything that gets guys actually tinkering with the radios instead of just plunking down the money and plugging them in is a good thing. The hobby for me is 90% building and tinkering the stuff together & 10% operating. If their signals sound less than pleasant, I'm sure someone will tell them. When I'm developing a new rig and first fire it up the response is usually "Yah, your on the air, FB OM, now fix the audio it sucks!" Then Timmy tells me what it sounds like and what he thinks is wrong and where I should consider change and that's the fun of it. I take it apart & next weekend try it again. After a while it sounds OK and I move onto the next project. I think I went into a major depression when I could not figure out what the next project should be after the last one but then screen modulating the 4 X 1 poped into my head, life is good! Anyway if we do not get a crop of new "Hams" (people who tinker), who will bother restoring the neat radios in the future that we are still building today? Bottom line, it's a good thing, knock yourself out. After you spend months trying to get that slop bucket rig sounding just OK maybe you will take a shot at that old DX-100 that's up in the attic? That's how a lot of todays AM'ers were created. Get out the Golden Screw Driver. If you screw it up too bad, let us know. We got lots of opinions!
Keith
WA1HZK
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AM is Not A Hobby - It's a "Way of Life"!
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Art
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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2005, 03:13:53 PM »

Yeppers, my speedo goes to 160mph but on crowded avenues with lesser vehicles around it would be highly inappropriate. 17M and up is often autobahn clear and clean and the bands the limit. 80M on a Saturday night . . . . . prolly not . . . we all know what to do and when to do it. Law abiding and considerate citizens will not be the problem. . . . or to put it another way . . . when wideband is outlawed only outlaws will have wideband.
A little consideration and common sense goes a long way.

-ap
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