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Author Topic: Neat Tool for Recapping/Replacing wired components  (Read 8286 times)
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Ed/KB1HYS
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« on: August 29, 2006, 06:23:34 PM »

Faced with recapping several old rigs, and looking at multi-component junctions, that I did not want to mess with, I decided to
try something and it worked out pretty good!!!

I made a simple tool to wind the end of the caps leads into a "spring" . Then I cut the original components
leads  off close to the casings leaving plenty of space.   Instert the original components lead through the "spring" and solder.
Trim off the excess.  It produces a neat looking joint that seems to be pretty strong.

What I did was, Cut some 1/2 inch dowels to about 6 inch lengths.(make one for different gauge wires)
Cut some peices of stiff piano wire (steel drill stock or wire nails would do too) to about 1/2 in lengths.
(try to use stuff that is close to the wire gauge you will be inserting, and it should be stiff!!)
Drill one peice of wire into the center of the dowel.

A second wire is put into the dowel about 1/16th inch or so away from the one in the center. 
Trim this one down to about 1/16-1/8 inch.
A little dab of epoxy to keep things tight.
Done!

To use, place the end of the lead between the two rods, and wind the lead around the longer one, keeping even pressure as you do.
You should get a nice tight spiral. Slip this over the end of the old components leads and solder!! 

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73 de Ed/KB1HYS
Happiness is Hot Tubes, Cold 807's, and warm room filling AM Sound.
 "I've spent three quarters of my life trying to figure out how to do a $50 job for $.50, the rest I spent trying to come up with the $0.50" - D. Gingery
David, K3TUE
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2006, 06:30:26 PM »

I made a simple tool to wind the end of the caps leads into a "spring" . Then I cut the original components
leads  off close to the casings leaving plenty of space.   Instert the original components lead through the "spring" and solder.
Trim off the excess.  It produces a neat looking joint that seems to be pretty strong.

I had read about one of these somewhere and thought it was a brilliant idea.  In fact, I think in the same place it said that it was the recommended way to replace leaded components by some manufacturers.
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David, K3TUE
w3jn
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2006, 08:07:39 PM »

THere are many purists who insist on unsoldering components from tube sockets, terminal strips, or whatnot.  This method tends to wreak more havoc than necessary; I ended up having to replace tube socket terminals, terminal strips, and clean up splashed solder til I tried this method.  Highly recommended! 

I think this tip is in the hints and kinks section somewhere.
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The Slab Bacon
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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2006, 07:49:58 AM »

I've been doing it that way for a long time. If it is easily done, I unsolder the component from the tube socket. But if the tie point is a real cluster f... , I use the wire wrap method, it saves a hell of a lot of time and aggrevation.

Instead of some special fancy tool, I just wind the component's lead around the shank of a small jewlers screwdriver. Wind up a nice tight coil and slobber it in. Many of the small shanked jewlers screwdrivers are real close to the sizes of the old component's leads. Works great!!
                                                         the Slab Bacon
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W3SLK
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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2006, 08:15:04 AM »

This may sound a little bit on the stupid side but are you introducing any unwanted inductance in series with the component? If someone has a picture(s) of their process I may be able to understand a little better.
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Mike(y)/W3SLK
Invisible airwaves crackle with life, bright antenna bristle with the energy. Emotional feedback, on timeless wavelength, bearing a gift beyond lights, almost free.... Spirit of Radio/Rush
KB2WIG
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« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2006, 11:51:33 AM »

duh.....   no its not a stupid question....  the solder fills in the 'coil"....  ... everything is solid  ....  klc
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2006, 12:07:31 PM »

Mark said:
Quote
I've had this on my web site for quite a while now......

http://www.k3msb.com/twiddle/twiddle.html

That cleared up all ambiguity Mark. Many thanks. I just wish I would have knew about that before I started tearing my Valiant's speech amp apart. Cry  It will help next time though.
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Mike(y)/W3SLK
Invisible airwaves crackle with life, bright antenna bristle with the energy. Emotional feedback, on timeless wavelength, bearing a gift beyond lights, almost free.... Spirit of Radio/Rush
The Slab Bacon
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« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2006, 12:27:03 PM »

I've had this on my web site for quite a while now......
http://www.k3msb.com/twiddle/twiddle.html


Hmmmm..................  that cap in the pix looks like it is being slobbered into an invader 2000 filter stack??
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WA1GFZ
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« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2006, 12:40:58 PM »

years ago Sprague used to include these little springs with replacement caps.
I used to think it was cheating. This is back in tv repair days.
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The Slab Bacon
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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2006, 02:12:01 PM »

years ago Sprague used to include these little springs with replacement caps.
I used to think it was cheating. This is back in tv repair days.

Yep, slip em in, pinch em down, and slobber em up! They were definately kool,

Frank,
        In the early days, I felt like you, but you know what. All is fair in love and war, I wish somebody made and sold them today. They would save enough time that we would have more time to make and eat pickled eggplant!!
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WA1GFZ
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« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2006, 02:27:30 PM »

There was a time when I thought PC boards were cheating
Then I thought surface mount was cheating, no post to wrap a lead around
Then I  worked on thick film hybrids and was convinced wire bonds on a die were really cheating.
There is no cheating in the pickled eggplant process
and making sauce
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