Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /homepages/11/d132647312/htdocs/Amfone/mkportal/include/SMF/smf_out.php on line 47
COMPUTER QUESTION I NEED SOME HELP




 
The AM Forum
October 14, 2019, 10:12:37 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Links Staff List Gallery Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: COMPUTER QUESTION I NEED SOME HELP  (Read 10401 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Art
Guest
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2011, 11:51:04 AM »

"You DO realize what you are doing is ILLEGAL, right"

I'm curious what you saw that was illegal. When you buy XP you get an operating license to use it on one computer (at a time). Fred removed the OS from one computer and installed it in another. I don't see any licensing or legal issue there.

As for the actual operation of the computer with the transplanted OS, this is a multi level "opportunity": The components of computer one will have a certain signature that is associated by Microsoft with that installation of XP. Your new computer will have a different signature. This means a call to MS wherein they ask how many computers have this particular XP os on it. The correct answer is one. They will then give you a code to activate your OS.
However, you have to get the thing working in the first place. The drivers will likely be different between the two computers and the resident drivers may prevent the OS from starting at all. That's why you need the original OS (or reasonable image thereof) to "repair" the installation OR a complete new install over the old OS but not the format and install to preserve your data. This may not work if some of the existing drivers cause hardware to be ignored or viewed by the OS as one type and really be another. In that case you should do a boot from a CD and save all your files to external media then do a format/reload of the OS.
If you don't want to do it that way you could put the drives back in the old computer and transfer all your important files to the second hard drive (I use this method) and then remove the boot disk to the new computer and do a format/reload of your programs.

As for the suggestions to use another OS, I have to agree, one is about like another to me with Windows being more universally equipped with drivers and more applications written for it. I'm still waiting and will probably die in that mode for Quicken to come up with a Linux version. . . . without going through an emulator. . .
GL ARt
Logged
KD6VXI
Contributing
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 2045


Making AM GREAT Again!


« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2011, 12:24:39 PM »

Just my $.02 worth..................

With the lisencing issue, what happens if you bought that copy of, say XP and your compuker has a big time crash? (Something literally burns up or fails mechanically)

Does that mean you cant reinstall it in a replacement box? ?  If so, there may be some form of extorsion or other laws that should protect the end user from having to be taken advantage of my the OS provider. I guess that is why everyone hates Microslop so much.....................

That's exactly the story, depending on the COPY of XP purchased.

If you purchase a REAL, legit copy of XP (NOT OEM licensed), you CAN move things around.

If you have a computer from, say Dell, and then decide (after it burns up) that you want to put the HDD in a computer from the guy building them down the street, then that is in fact ILLEGAL.


When I was into IT, this was a HUGE issue for us.  If anything BUT the HDD failed, common sense dictated pulling the hDD out of the failed machine, putting it in another machine, get windows to boot, and be done.  Then I entered into Microsoft Select licensing agreement and found out the difference between OEM and 'original boxed' MS licensing.


Yes, it's confusing.  No, it doesn't make much, if any sense.

--Shane
KD6VXI
Logged
KD6VXI
Contributing
Member
*
Online Online

Posts: 2045


Making AM GREAT Again!


« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2011, 12:30:21 PM »

"You DO realize what you are doing is ILLEGAL, right"

I'm curious what you saw that was illegal. When you buy XP you get an operating license to use it on one computer (at a time). Fred removed the OS from one computer and installed it in another. I don't see any licensing or legal issue there.

As for the actual operation of the computer with the transplanted OS, this is a multi level "opportunity": The components of computer one will have a certain signature that is associated by Microsoft with that installation of XP. Your new computer will have a different signature. This means a call to MS wherein they ask how many computers have this particular XP os on it. The correct answer is one. They will then give you a code to activate your OS.

All that would actually be true, if he had a "Original boxed version" of XP.  He doesn't.  He has an oem copy.  OEM licensing means it can ONLY be installed on THAT motherboard.

Shoot, with Vista you started having problems when a dvd/blu-ray would be changed out.  Or lose your video card and replace it.  THEN, Microshaft will only give you so many unlock codes for WGA activation.

So, yes, it IS illegal to use an OEM copy of Windows on ANY machine other than THE machine it was purchased WITH.  Anyone who tells you different is lucky enough to not have had Microsoft crawling up their backside.

Microsoft says they license the actual 'bits of code', and not the copy of windows itself.  THATs how they got away with this in a court of law.


--Shane
KD6VXI
Logged
WD5JKO
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769


WD5JKO


« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2011, 03:31:27 PM »



I have done Dell laptops, and a HP laptop using OEM XP CD's. Neither time was I prompted to enter the key code. Only when using the Dell CD on a HP was I greeted with a key code request. Seems like the OEM licensing pertains to a particular brand, and possibly model, and NOT just one computer. Is this Illegal? I dunno, but if it works, and your not asked for a key code, then what the heck? Oh, the OEM disk I had was for a HP Desktop, and it worked fine on a similar vintage HP laptop. Passed Windows Genuine Advantage too. :-)

On the other side of the law is Tiny XP, a neutered bit-torrent version of XP that also comes with MS Office 2003 full version. Do a clean install with this, and with one boot it is up and running since it has a built in driver pack. In fact the guy I know was so surprised that he neglected to unhook the wireless antenna at first. When it booted up the first time, it connected to a neighbors WIFI that was not encrypted, and then went to Windows update, and was branded bad by Windows Genuine Advantage (once branded bad you have to start over). To run this stuff you need to have Windows update OFF, be behind a good hardware firewall, and also run Zone Alarm. Good for casual "blazing" surfing on modest hardware, but not for doing anything like finances on.  Tongue

Jim
WD5JKO
Logged
ssbothwell SWL
Guest
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2011, 05:32:36 PM »

That's exactly the story, depending on the COPY of XP purchased.

If you purchase a REAL, legit copy of XP (NOT OEM licensed), you CAN move things around.

If you have a computer from, say Dell, and then decide (after it burns up) that you want to put the HDD in a computer from the guy building them down the street, then that is in fact ILLEGAL.


When I was into IT, this was a HUGE issue for us.  If anything BUT the HDD failed, common sense dictated pulling the hDD out of the failed machine, putting it in another machine, get windows to boot, and be done.  Then I entered into Microsoft Select licensing agreement and found out the difference between OEM and 'original boxed' MS licensing.


Yes, it's confusing.  No, it doesn't make much, if any sense.

--Shane
KD6VXI

i want to apologize for my response. i didn't know that OEM licenses are not transferable between computers. i was wrong and thought i was right. sorry.
Logged
W1ATR
Resident HVAC junkie
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1132


« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2011, 11:07:18 PM »

That's exactly the story, depending on the COPY of XP purchased.

If you purchase a REAL, legit copy of XP (NOT OEM licensed), you CAN move things around.

If you have a computer from, say Dell, and then decide (after it burns up) that you want to put the HDD in a computer from the guy building them down the street, then that is in fact ILLEGAL.


When I was into IT, this was a HUGE issue for us.  If anything BUT the HDD failed, common sense dictated pulling the hDD out of the failed machine, putting it in another machine, get windows to boot, and be done.  Then I entered into Microsoft Select licensing agreement and found out the difference between OEM and 'original boxed' MS licensing.


Yes, it's confusing.  No, it doesn't make much, if any sense.

--Shane
KD6VXI

i want to apologize for my response. i didn't know that OEM licenses are not transferable between computers. i was wrong and thought i was right. sorry.

Don't sweat it. This is how we all learn. 
Logged

Don't start nuthin, there won't be nuthin.

Jared W1ATR


Click for radio pix
WD5JKO
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769


WD5JKO


« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2011, 12:21:53 AM »

So, yes, it IS illegal to use an OEM copy of Windows on ANY machine other than THE machine it was purchased WITH.  Anyone who tells you different is lucky enough to not have had Microsoft crawling up their backside.

  Around here (Round Rock is Dell Headquarters) some of the used computer stores will sell OEM Dell copies of windows XP and the driver disk for $5 to $10 cash. For home use (not business) on a Dell, and no need to enter a key code, why not? WGA passes too.
  This is with old hardware, and an obsolete operating system. Both Dell and Microsoft got there cut already on that box at least once. I don't see how Microsoft cares since WGA passes when the OEM software loaded matches the hardware.

Jim
WD5JKO
Logged
W2PFY
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13107



« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2011, 08:01:53 AM »

Telling me that you can't transfer a HD to another computer is bunk. It would be the same as telling me that you cannot put a junk yard engine into your old truck when it made sense to put another engine into it rather than a rebuild. There may be a law in some states where you need report an engine change but I never heard of it?

If it boots up how would they know that the HD is in another MB?

OK, it may be written into law but it's a dumb law.

Logged

The secrecy of my job prevents me from knowing what I am doing.
WA1GFZ
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11152



« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2011, 08:30:18 AM »

The reason for this was to prevent users from loading hard drives and then moving them to other computers. Gates was a bootlegger so he knew all the angles.
Logged
Art
Guest
« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2011, 10:39:09 AM »

"All that would actually be true, if he had a "Original boxed version" of XP.  He doesn't.  He has an oem copy.  OEM licensing means it can ONLY be installed on THAT motherboard."

Ahhh so. I didn't grasp that point. Yep, the OEMs make a deal with MS to load the OS onto their machines and the purchaser of the computer didn't have that deal so the conditions of the contract are broken if the individual moves that OS to another machine. That I understand. I build custom computers and have no such deal with MS so all my OSs are original boxed versions. It's expensive but painless. I often use Linux (Ubuntu) to cut costs in this area.

Art

Logged
W1ATR
Resident HVAC junkie
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1132


« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2011, 12:54:00 PM »

There's another reason for OEM versions. The reason an OEM builders version is cheaper is because this places the cust service requirements on the builder/seller of the machine. With OEM software, if you have a problem, you call the builder/seller of the computer, aka Dell, gateway, etc... This is the reason you can buy a builders OEM operating system from places like newegg for about a third less than the retail version.

With a retail version, the cust service is supplied by MS thru calling their CS phone number.
Logged

Don't start nuthin, there won't be nuthin.

Jared W1ATR


Click for radio pix
flintstone mop
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5031


« Reply #36 on: September 07, 2011, 06:37:37 AM »

I remember the mystery days of Win 95/98 trying to get a computer to do anything outside of the case. Connect to the internet,play music, All of that time wasted on the telephone trying to get a defective product to work. XP is/was heaven as an OS. Win 7 32 bit is very nice. 64 bit starts getting into compatibility issues with older software that WE might encounter.
I enjoy these high-dollar-high-end computers that are dirt cheap on ePay. Makes my Flex so happy
Fred
Logged

Fred KC4MOP
KB2WIG
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4317



« Reply #37 on: September 07, 2011, 05:39:23 PM »

 " I enjoy these high-dollar-high-end computers that are dirt cheap on ePay. Makes my Flex so happy. "


You sound too smug.


klc
Logged

What? Me worry?
K7EK
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 31


ASA Lives!


WWW
« Reply #38 on: September 07, 2011, 09:16:14 PM »

With XP (and probably other versions of Window$), a unique checksum is created during the initial install. That checksum is derived based on the hardware that happens to be in your computer. Since you moved the hard drives from one computer to another,  it's inevitable that you will have problems since the checksum does not match the new computer. It's sort of like a one of a kind electronic fingerprint that can't easily be reproduced on another computer. The only way to overcome this and prevent future issues is to completely nuke the hard drive and do a full clean install of Windows.  You will want to copy only your unique personal files to a backup medium before reinstalling Windows. There's no need to copy Windows system files as those will all be freshly installed.  That checksum is a Micro$haft security feature meant to discourage piracy of their Windows Operation system, amongst other things.  If the checksum doesn't match the hardware in your computer for some reason, Windows disables itself and forces reactivation. This often happens when someone adds memory, a new peripheral card or hard drive, etc. A phone call to Microsoft will then be required to reactivate your system... That means talking to a some foreigner with a heavy accent. The English is perfect but you can't understand a word they are saying because of their heavy accent. I'm sure that you will be much happier with a completely fresh install of Windows because all of the correct drivers will be installed on the new computer, plus the system will be snappy because the registry has not yet become corrupted (an inevitability on all Windows computers), thusly avoiding all of the aforementioned hassles.  I hope you have a valid Windows installation CD or DVD with CD Key. Without that you are out of luck.


Best regards,

Gary, K7EK

Logged
k4kyv
Contributing Member
Don
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 10062



« Reply #39 on: September 07, 2011, 09:39:13 PM »

I have done Dell laptops, and a HP laptop using OEM XP CD's. Neither time was I prompted to enter the key code. Only when using the Dell CD on a HP was I greeted with a key code request. Seems like the OEM licensing pertains to a particular brand, and possibly model, and NOT just one computer. Is this Illegal? I dunno, but if it works, and your not asked for a key code, then what the heck?

Kinda like losing sleep over your voice peaks at 100% modulation exceeding the bogus p.e.p. limit.
Logged

Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

- - -
This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
K5UJ
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2845



WWW
« Reply #40 on: September 07, 2011, 10:38:53 PM »

I have done Dell laptops, and a HP laptop using OEM XP CD's. Neither time was I prompted to enter the key code. Only when using the Dell CD on a HP was I greeted with a key code request. Seems like the OEM licensing pertains to a particular brand, and possibly model, and NOT just one computer. Is this Illegal? I dunno, but if it works, and your not asked for a key code, then what the heck?

Kinda like losing sleep over your voice peaks at 100% modulation exceeding the bogus p.e.p. limit.

I guess you don't know about the new FCC rule mandating ops have operations performed to make their voices symmetric. 
Logged

"Not taking crap or giving it is a pretty good lifestyle."--Frank
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

AMfone - Dedicated to Amplitude Modulation on the Amateur Radio Bands
 AMfone 2001-2015
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.081 seconds with 19 queries.