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gas prices




 
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Jack-KA3ZLR-
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« Reply #25 on: August 16, 2005, 04:01:51 AM »

Hey man back in the Late Seventies, the Alaskan Pipeline was gona save the Day, whose day did it save..? All these Ocean Going drilling Platforms Cost Major Dollars to operate and Service. There were plans and Designs put into place years ago that had some foresight to them But, let's face it, Look what's being Built for use, I'm in traffic all day long, Soccor Moms in Hummers,  Cadillac Escaliads, Gigantic pickups for Sport and leisure, All Nice Toys..But No real Cost effectiveness, No one is going to give up anything that interfears with Personal Convience.

I was getting a Coffee at convience store on Rt 30 it's one of those Large Sheetz and while walking back to my truck a few cage drivers were conversing i over heard them talking about the price and One woman Blurted out I don't care My husband will Pay for it...

I thought What a Guy... She was Fueling her Big SUV...

So Much overkill and waste in Transportation.
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GEORGE/W2AMR
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« Reply #26 on: August 16, 2005, 05:23:26 AM »

This might have something to do with it.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/8646744/
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w3bv
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« Reply #27 on: August 16, 2005, 05:53:22 AM »

"In the real world, most of what you pay at the pump is a direct result of state and federal taxes".

_____________________

Motorists now pay an average of 44 cents per gallon in federal, state and local gas taxes, according to the American Petroleum Institute.

Nationwide, the gas tax generated $34.6 billion for state and local governments in 2004 — about 3.5% of all tax collections, according to the Census Bureau. The federal government gave states an additional $30 billion for transportation projects, mostly from the 18.4-cent-per-gallon federal gas tax.

Overall, gas tax collections cover about half of the $120 billion state and local governments spend annually on roads.

Gas tax collections have grown modestly compared with income, sales and property tax collections. Gas tax collections have risen an average of 3% a year in the past decade.

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W2VW
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« Reply #28 on: August 16, 2005, 08:22:29 AM »


Motorists now pay an average of 44 cents per gallon in federal, state and local gas taxes, according to the American Petroleum Institute.

Stop confusing us with facts. Is the tax portion of what we pay at the pump constant or is it a percentage of the total figure?
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Steve W8TOW
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« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2005, 08:27:20 AM »

Gas hit $2.79 / gal for 87 oct... here in E. Lansing. THis is for middle of the
road station...not one of the"high price" places... I suppose you might find
87 oct for $2.69 / gal somewhere in Lansing but the time spent to find the
station would consume the savings!

So...parked the cars....pulled out the bike and peddling to work...
only 2 miles...but I sure don't wanna do that in the snow!
73 steve
8tow, using the alternative vehicle for awhile  Shocked
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Always buiilding & fixing stuff. Current station is a "Old Buzzard" KW, running a pair of Taylor T-200's modulated by Taylor 203Z's; Johnson 500 / SX-101A; Globe King 400B / BC-1004; and Finally, BC-610 with SX28  CU 160m morn & 75m wkends.
73  W8TOW
w3bv
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« Reply #30 on: August 16, 2005, 09:45:27 AM »

"Is the tax portion of what we pay at the pump constant or is it a percentage of the total figure?"

____________

Taxes on gasoline, and how they are assessed, vary from state to state. Here in Pennsylvania gas taxes work like this:

According to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the Liquid Fuels Tax, more commonly known as the gas tax, must be spent on highway related activities such as construction, maintenance, and safety.  The state supplements the proceeds of the gas tax with revenue from vehicle and drivers license fees.  Together, with additional help from the federal government, they comprise almost all of the money spent by state government on highways.

Pennsylvania applies several types of taxes on fuels, each with a different rate and different base.  The basic liquid fuels and fuels use tax is the original gas tax in Pennsylvania and is used in every other state.  It uses the traditional cents-per-gallon approach.  The current rate is 12¢ per gallon.  In addition, Pennsylvania assesses an Oil Franchise Tax based on the wholesale price of gasoline.  The Oil Franchise Tax rate is set annually based on the average wholesale price of gasoline for the 12-month period ending the previous September.  The minimum rate is 13.9¢ per gallon.  For 2004 the rate was 14.2¢.  In addition, state government levies taxes on aviation fuels, alternative fuels, and fuel used by motor carriers.

The current combined tax rate is 26.2¢ per gallon (12¢ liquid fuels tax + 14.2¢ Oil Franchise tax).   And beginning in January 2005, the tax rate jumped to 30¢ per gallon.  The source of the increase is a 3.8¢ per gallon increase in the Oil Franchise Tax due to the significant increase in the wholesale price of gasoline.  The table below illustrates the recent history of the tax rate. 

Calendar Year    Liquid FuelsTax    Oil Franchise Tax    Total Tax

2005                          12¢                 8.0¢                    30.0¢
2004                          12¢               14.2¢                    26.2¢
2003                          12¢               13.9¢                    25.9¢
2002                          12¢               14.6¢                    26.6¢
2001                          12¢               14.0¢                    26.0¢
2000                          12¢               13.9¢                    25.9¢

Pennsylvania’s 26.2¢ per gallon rate for 2004 was the 5th highest in the nation as of January 1, 2004.  If the rates for other states remain constant, Pennsylvania’s rate of 30¢ will be the 2nd  highest in the nation in 2005, trailing only Rhode Island’s 31¢.

In the most recently completed fiscal year, various taxes on liquid fuels combined to yield $1.1 billion. This represents over half of all receipts used for highway transportation.  Driver and vehicle license fees account for most of the remainder of funding.

Taxes normally paid at the pump – the Liquid Fuels and Fuels Use, and Oil Franchise Taxes – generated the vast majority of those funds (97%).  Overall growth rates in gas tax receipts have been relatively low.  For example, over the past 5 years receipts increased 5.7%, barely more than half the rate of inflation.  In the previous 10 years, the increase was only 13.3% compared to a 24.2% inflation rate.  Obviously, a 3.8¢ increase for 2005 will have at least a short-term impact on the trends.

                                Rate of Growth: All Liquid Fuels Taxes 

Liquid Fuels Taxes                         Inflation
1-Year Growth       0.7%                   2.3%
5-Year Growth       5.7%                 10.4%
10-Year Growth   13.3%                 24.2%

The overriding reason for slow growth is a moderate increase in the number of miles driven offset by greater fuel efficiency.  In a sense, funding for highways in Pennsylvania and other states has been a victim of the success of a national policy that’s resulted in a steady increase in the fuel efficiency of cars over the past 30 years.  The result?  Limited growth in the tax base.

Historically, gas tax yields have been relatively steady but at a growth rate lower than inflation.  The result has been the growing difficulty of funding transportation needs over the past several years, particularly with the current uncertainty of federal funding.  However, the  increase in the Oil Franchise Tax rate that took effect on January 1, 2005 likely will provide some level of fiscal relief to the highway budget. 
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W2VW
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« Reply #31 on: August 16, 2005, 10:21:52 AM »

"Is the tax portion of what we pay at the pump constant or is it a percentage of the total figure?"

____________

Taxes on gasoline vary from state to state. Here in Pennsylvania gas taxes work like this:

Snip
Thanks for the clarification. I feel like I just copied someone's homework. So If I understand this, the price at the pump will go even higher as the state adjusts it's rated portion of the fuel tax at the fiscal year's end. Also, in terms of real dollars the tax is actually currently less than it was in years past. Great news. Time to go out now and buy an SUV to put in the backyard to store radio stuff. First, will check the air in the tires and advance the ignition timing a little.
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w3bv
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« Reply #32 on: August 16, 2005, 11:09:11 AM »

Gas prices around the world:

http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/price.html
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k4kyv
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Don
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« Reply #33 on: August 16, 2005, 01:39:21 PM »

One cannot help but wonder what all is behind this.  Particularly, it is interesting to note how certain areas and communities seem to be singled out for even higher than average gas prices!  The Fort Wayne, IN area for instance,  is generally always 5-15% higher than average in the state.  It is also interesting to note also that Allen County (which includes Fort Wayne) has had one of the highest vehicle per capita ratios in the U.S.  Could it be, that we have a little marketeering strategy here?  Hmmm...Maximize profits, while working on the areas with high concentration of useage.  As the saying goes....Whatever the market will bear.   Angry  Angry

Don't worry.  It's going to be all right.   Congress took care of it.  They are watching out for our interests, you know.  They just extended daylight shifting time by four weeks!  That'll have gas prices back down below $2.00/gal before you can blink an eye.
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

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« Reply #34 on: August 16, 2005, 02:26:47 PM »


VENEZUELA     CARACAS     $0.14
Must be some really good stuff.  Maybe made from crushed escaped Nazi party leader bones instead of dinosaur parts.
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Ed KB1HVS
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« Reply #35 on: August 16, 2005, 03:24:44 PM »

Massachusetts 23.5 23.5 Inc. 2.5 cpg UST Tax      Gee. It woulda been only  $2.30 a gallon today. 
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GEORGE/W2AMR
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« Reply #36 on: August 16, 2005, 05:12:47 PM »

One cannot help but wonder what all is behind this.  Particularly, it is interesting to note how certain areas and communities seem to be singled out for even higher than average gas prices!  The Fort Wayne, IN area for instance,  is generally always 5-15% higher than average in the state.  It is also interesting to note also that Allen County (which includes Fort Wayne) has had one of the highest vehicle per capita ratios in the U.S.  Could it be, that we have a little marketeering strategy here?  Hmmm...Maximize profits, while working on the areas with high concentration of useage.  As the saying goes....Whatever the market will bear.   Angry  Angry

Don't worry.  It's going to be all right.   Congress took care of it.  They are watching out for our interests, you know.  They just extended daylight shifting time by four weeks!  That'll have gas prices back down below $2.00/gal before you can blink an eye.
Grin Grin Grin
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W1DAN
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« Reply #37 on: August 16, 2005, 06:08:54 PM »

Hi All:

I am started to REALLY get worried about these gas prices. I see the day in the far future where many of us have to sell our houses and radios to pay for gas. This would allow the rich to get richer and the middle class turn into the poor.

I have ALWAYS wanted an electric vehicle...easier to make, cleaner and cheaper to drive. To make sure the G'ment is "for us", read about how Ford is recalling all their electric vehicles and will CRUSH them:

http://www.evworld.com/view.cfm?section=article&storyid=798

http://www.rinkadinkproductions.com/newslinks.html

http://www.freepress.org/departments/display/20/2003/343

http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2002/09/04/woe_to_ev1/print.html

Also manufacturers can only make a low emission vehicle as long as it it PETROLIUM based.

Will I will still drive my Corolla until I cannot afford it anymore. Guess being frugal does not pay.

73,
Dan W1DAN
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W1UJR
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« Reply #38 on: August 16, 2005, 06:41:06 PM »

Hi All:

I am started to REALLY get worried about these gas prices. I see the day in the far future where many of us have to sell our houses and radios to pay for gas. This would allow the rich to get richer and the middle class turn into the poor.


Shades of the "Vast Right Wing Conspiracy" rears it ugly head once again.

Heavens to Betsy, the sky is falling, the rich are eating up the poor.

The evil capitalist oilmen from Texas have conspired with the Osama and the Detroit auto empire to collect and crush all electric vehicles.

It’s a plot I tell you, can't you see, they are after us, run for the hills!  Shocked

They have:

Raised gas prices without reason

Destroyed oil refineries in the name of profit

Collected and crushed all electric vehicles

Conspired with the automotive companies to design, develop and addict the American public to large gas guzzling SUVs

Engaged in price fixing to punish those nasty "Blue States"

Made all of us wear polyester leisure suits (made of petrol-chemicals don't you know)


Please...if you are going to piss and moan, at least piss and moan about something worthwhile.
I feel like I am at a PMS convention here.  Grin

For example, why not discuss the recent Supreme Court decision on eminent domain?
Now that’s something that affects each and every one of us and our Constitutional rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

I'll gladly pay $10 per gallon gas prices if the goverment protects my property rights and keeps it hands out of my pocket.

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wa1knx
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« Reply #39 on: August 16, 2005, 08:26:04 PM »

huh, I don't see any right wing plot in dans post,, but I do wonder
why not let the people buy ther old leased electric vehicles. sure kill
the product line if its not profitable. but a few folks seem pretty happy
with the product so let em keep em. wish I'd see one.
 
there was a guy back in mass during the 79 crunch who electrified
his ford ranger. pretty nice project, though I'm sure it wasn't as
good as the factory ones. I wouldn't mind one of them out in AZ with
a large solar panel on the house roof to charge.

Oh Bruce, start a thread on eminent domain, I'll rant on that one!
that has got to go, I hope that supreme court judge looses his
property!!
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am forever!
W1UJR
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« Reply #40 on: August 16, 2005, 08:36:24 PM »

Oh Bruce, start a thread on eminent domain, I'll rant on that one!
that has got to go, I hope that supreme court judge looses his
property!!


Ok, see Black Robed Gangsters

http://amfone.net/Amforum/index.php?topic=5343.msg40423#msg40423
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Ed W1XAW
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« Reply #41 on: August 16, 2005, 09:32:23 PM »

It doesn't take a genius to understand that a rapid rise in fuel rates will hurt those that can least afford it and eventually be reflected in higher consumer prices for almost everything.  I suspect that the consumer basket of goods would show greater inflation than we are seeing if it weren't for the general downward pressure on consumer prices that comes with escalating Chinese sourcing.  I noticed that some air freight is seeing fuel surcharges of over 50 cents a kilo chargeable which means that air freighted consumer goods the size of say a shoe box have an extra dollar in landing costs.  Higher prices and less money to spend for lower income people could mean a retail slowdown.  I know an older person who has had XOM stock for a long time and the oil companies are making out just fine. 


The well established reason for higher fuel prices is the fact that I recently purchased a vehicle with a V-8.   Bet we don't see the cadaverlac too soon!

Ed
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John Holotko
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« Reply #42 on: August 17, 2005, 04:34:14 AM »

One cannot help but wonder what all is behind this.  Particularly, it is interesting to note how certain areas and communities seem to be singled out for even higher than average gas prices! <snip>

I just glad that I am in America where I can do what I want, say what I want and drive what I want.
I'll pay an extra $5-10 per week in gas costs for that privledge.

Do I hear an Amen?
Or at least a "God Bless Mel Gibon"?  Grin

It's good to know that someone enjoys getting robbed. Too bad the rest of us have to get robbed as well.
 
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John Holotko
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« Reply #43 on: August 17, 2005, 04:43:40 AM »

How Those Big Bucks End Up in Big Oil's PocketsBy Steven Mufson The Washington PostSunday, August 7, 2005

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/08/05/AR2005080501997_pf.html
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« Reply #44 on: August 17, 2005, 09:35:20 AM »

Does anyone know what the DOE function is these days.

Another of retired at work welfare gang.
I would think these guys should be coming up with a new approach

It can't be a full time job monitoring nuke tests these days. 
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w3bv
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« Reply #45 on: August 17, 2005, 11:07:30 AM »

"Does anyone know what the DOE function is these days"

______________

Act as the propaganda arm of oil companies?
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« Reply #46 on: August 17, 2005, 11:51:54 AM »

oh so that is why the stupid hydrogen idea
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W9GT
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« Reply #47 on: August 17, 2005, 12:07:38 PM »

"Is the tax portion of what we pay at the pump constant or is it a percentage of the total figure?"

____________

Taxes on gasoline vary from state to state. Here in Pennsylvania gas taxes work like this:

Snip
Thanks for the clarification. I feel like I just copied someone's homework. So If I understand this, the price at the pump will go even higher as the state adjusts it's rated portion of the fuel tax at the fiscal year's end. Also, in terms of real dollars the tax is actually currently less than it was in years past. Great news. Time to go out now and buy an SUV to put in the backyard to store radio stuff. First, will check the air in the tires and advance the ignition timing a little.


Ahh...I love this suggestion!!  Perhaps it might be cheaper than building a garage or a storage shed for the boatanchor stuff! 
There certainly seems to be a great deal of concern and accompanying POLITICAL PONTIFICATION on this board regarding this subject!  Basically, I think everyone agrees that high gas prices suck........regardless of the cause.  What we really should be concerned about is how this cost factor might disrupt the truly important activities in our lives....like going to hamfests!!  Well,  we have been car pooling for that purpose for years....so business as usual.   Grin
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Tubes and Black Wrinkle Rule!!
73, Jack, W9GT
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« Reply #48 on: August 17, 2005, 03:24:02 PM »

I haven't found $3.11 here in Colchester. Found $2.63 for regular, 2.73 for midgrade and diesel and 2.83 for premium. That's high enough....  But no $3.11.  Some gas jockey must have been screwing around in an effort to make news.
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Bob
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His fear was when I turned it on for the first time life on earth would come to a stand still.
w3bv
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« Reply #49 on: August 17, 2005, 03:44:57 PM »

".... so business as usual"

_______________

Go back to sleep, Jack Smiley
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