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SB-220 amp 120 volt vs. 240 use




 
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Author Topic: SB-220 amp 120 volt vs. 240 use  (Read 21462 times)
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N1WVQ
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« Reply #25 on: July 20, 2020, 10:06:58 PM »

Thanks Marty! Glad to hear that you still have both & that getting a 240 line run isnít a big deal! My conundrums are regarding hard/soft key & soft start. Thanks for this thread, as itís a help a full decade later!
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« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2020, 04:58:45 PM »

While rebuilding that amp, make sure it has at least a 12 gauge power cord if running on 120V. Sometimes they get changed out.
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« Reply #27 on: July 21, 2020, 08:34:00 PM »

    Been running an SB-220 at 300 watts carrier for 40 YEARS with no issues. 20 years ago I installed the Harbach power supply board, filter caps, and fan. Just replaced the original tubes last year. That amp runs on 220 but my other one, bone stock runs on 110 and can also do 300 watts but it does run a bit hot.The fan is the best thing you can do for one of these amps. Forget the "soft start". Last year I had one in the shop and the amp had a shorted tube, which took out the soft start but never blew the breakers on the amp. Inspection of the soft start board revealed the relays in it are only good for 12 amps. Pure crap. The contacts were welded and the PC runs (also too small to handle 20 amps) were vaporized. Your Ht-40 and controlled carrier will not work that amp very hard and can't hurt it.

   And here's a special "Bronx Cheer" to the guy in W8 land who's website says they are only safe to run 100 watts on AM due to insufficient cooling CFM. Did you do the testing in a wind tunnel to determine that?   
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N1WVQ
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« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2020, 10:00:40 PM »

While rebuilding that amp, make sure it has at least a 12 gauge power cord if running on 120V. Sometimes they get changed out.
Iíve converted the SB-200 to run on 240. The SB-220 has a sufficiently thick cord, but that too will be switched out to 240. I have 12-gauge cable ready to go for it!
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« Reply #29 on: July 23, 2020, 01:53:48 AM »

Who still has 110 VAC feeding there receptacles? I know I don't. My line voltage varies from 122 to 125 VAC, depending on the time of day. Also, I monitor my hertz only because I was given a very nice, oil filled meter and that stays between 58 and 62 cycle.
Gary
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ka1shu.
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« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2020, 10:55:42 PM »

congratulations
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WU2D
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« Reply #31 on: July 26, 2020, 08:20:00 AM »

Hi Marty,

I got some 10/3 Romex and stuck it a on separate breaker and ran it across the basement to a stout outlet near the amplifier which is a Gonset GSB-201. Seems to work fine on 120V. I also use that outlet on my Tank Setup.

73's Mike WU2D
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« Reply #32 on: July 26, 2020, 04:38:26 PM »

Soft-starts that die during a major fault condition are badly designed I'll leave it at that. No free lunches!
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KK4RF
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« Reply #33 on: July 26, 2020, 05:43:26 PM »

Thanks, Mike. Actually, I had an electrician run a 220 volt line for me a number of years back and use it for the SB-220. I still use 120 volts for the SB-200 and SB-201.---Marty, KK4RF
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N1WVQ
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« Reply #34 on: July 26, 2020, 11:00:49 PM »

Who still has 110 VAC feeding there receptacles? I know I don't. My line voltage varies from 122 to 125 VAC, depending on the time of day. Also, I monitor my hertz only because I was given a very nice, oil filled meter and that stays between 58 and 62 cycle.
Gary
Precisely! I have 123 & 237!
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N1WVQ
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« Reply #35 on: July 26, 2020, 11:02:32 PM »

Thanks, Mike. Actually, I had an electrician run a 220 volt line for me a number of years back and use it for the SB-220. I still use 120 volts for the SB-200 and SB-201.---Marty, KK4RF
Did you get the 201 as a backup, or are you a collector, or another reason? I have a í200 & a í220. Iíd like to get the 201 & 221 at some point.
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« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2020, 08:30:49 AM »

Who still has 110 VAC feeding there receptacles? I know I don't. My line voltage varies from 122 to 125 VAC, depending on the time of day. Also, I monitor my hertz only because I was given a very nice, oil filled meter and that stays between 58 and 62 cycle.
Gary
Precisely! I have 123 & 237!

That's a pretty big imbalance.  That means you have 123 and 114 phase to ground.

Should be within a volt or two of each other, not 9.

--Shane
KD6VXI

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w4bfs
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« Reply #37 on: July 27, 2020, 09:02:25 AM »

one last thing .... the fil xfmr needs an added fuse otherwise it is only protected by the mains fuse ... I have replaced too many of these over the years ... a common problem in many amps and xmtrs
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« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2020, 10:42:28 PM »

Who still has 110 VAC feeding there receptacles? I know I don't. My line voltage varies from 122 to 125 VAC, depending on the time of day. Also, I monitor my hertz only because I was given a very nice, oil filled meter and that stays between 58 and 62 cycle.
Gary
Precisely! I have 123 & 237!

In summer I have 109-115 depending on how many people run the a/c. Winter usually 120. Complained to the electric provider but they won't install a bigger pole transformer. Perhaps the high wire has the regulation issue as I'm at the far end of it.
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« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2020, 02:06:25 AM »

If you want the pole pig replaced, a clean shot with a 308 will do the trick. A fellow I knew did just that, god rest his soul.
Regards,
Gary
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N1WVQ
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« Reply #40 on: July 29, 2020, 09:16:07 PM »

Who still has 110 VAC feeding there receptacles? I know I don't. My line voltage varies from 122 to 125 VAC, depending on the time of day. Also, I monitor my hertz only because I was given a very nice, oil filled meter and that stays between 58 and 62 cycle.
Gary
Precisely! I have 123 & 237!

That's a pretty big imbalance.  That means you have 123 and 114 phase to ground.

Should be within a volt or two of each other, not 9.

--Shane
KD6VXI


Today itís 119 & 243.
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« Reply #41 on: July 30, 2020, 11:31:09 AM »

If you want the pole pig replaced, a clean shot with a 308 will do the trick. A fellow I knew did just that, god rest his soul.
Regards,
Gary

The pole transformer has failed and been replaced 3 times over the last decade. Twice it burned out in the summer because it's likely running seriously overloaded. Once a squirrel got on it and blew it up, don't ask me how that happened. According to the contractor it's 25KVA and they have to put in the same exact electrical KVA rated unit.

They told me I should call Oncor the electric delivery company in charge of the lines and transfomers and ask them to put in a bigger one. Oncor does not want to do this and outlined a whole procedure and then presumed to tell me that I would have to pay for some of it. It is of course not just me buying electric power, but the whole street.

Many of the homes around here started out with 100A or smaller service in the late 1940s along with those nice screw-in fuses and all, and now they have modern conveniences like HVAC systems and some have all-electric appliances.

With this has come the necessary 200A panels, yet the infrastructure has not been upgraded. My point of view is that I should have no less than 115V and it is the job of the electric provider to supply the proper voltage. I have to wonder where I can find out the law or rule about mains voltage. There has so be something in writing from the Public Utility Commission.
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« Reply #42 on: July 30, 2020, 03:01:49 PM »

Pat .... had an issue with local utility company over poor line voltage regulation ... it was causing a/c compressors to have a short life due to too low line voltage.... beg, borrow or otherwise obtain a recording voltmeter to obtain a hard copy of provided power ... this will help your case... I think there are advocacy groups out there
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Beefus

O would some power the gift give us
to see ourselves as others see us.
It would from many blunders free us.         Robert Burns
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