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ART-13 and other "original" military electronics training documents




 
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Author Topic: ART-13 and other "original" military electronics training documents  (Read 513 times)
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w8khk
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« on: March 22, 2020, 08:43:10 PM »

I am not sure whether this should eventually end up in the military, or possibly the "Printed Material" forum.  I will start here to solicit feedback, and go from there.

While sorting and filing documents left to me by my dad, W8KHK / W2DU, I stumbled upon some original training documents that he used when he was a naval electronics instructor in the navy in Corpus Christi, Texas, during WW2.  

One approximately 30 page document covered the first three weeks of training for new recruits.  It starts off with power supplies, and then covers many other aspects of naval electronics, based on land, ship, and aircraft equipment.  I will attach a .PDF of the first page of this training material.

Perhaps of more interest is the document for training week four.  This is a 24 page document focusing on the ART-13.  I attach also the first page of this document.  Although the documents are rather old and somewhat stained and faded, I was surprised how readable the scanned copies appear.  

I do not have a method to produce a single file of all the pages.  I can scan each page to a single .PDF, .JPG, etc.  I also do not know whether there is a preferred format for sharing documents in the printed material AMfone resource.

Therefore, I am throwing this out to see if there is any interest in proceeding with scanning the documents.  Perhaps Patrick, KD5OEI, might like to add these to the Bunker of Doom, and provide links from AMfone.   I could either provide the actual documents to interested parties, or scan each page to .PDF and allow another person to merge it all together into a sharable format.  

What say you military equipment buffs?

* IMG_0027.pdf (1462.81 KB - downloaded 57 times.)
* IMG_0028.pdf (1012.41 KB - downloaded 43 times.)
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Rick / W8KHK  ex WB2HKX, WB4GNR
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2020, 10:12:17 PM »

If you scan them page by page, I can make them into a single pdf file bud.

Scan them and we can share via Dropbox or Google drive...

--Shane
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w8khk
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« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2020, 12:21:14 AM »

Sounds good, Shane, Thanks.  I will get them scanned in the next few days and will be in touch.  Hopefully a single PDF of each resource will be appropriate for the "Printed Material" repository here.
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Rick / W8KHK  ex WB2HKX, WB4GNR
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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2020, 03:58:49 PM »

I vote yea!

Thanks for taking it on Shane. I know it's a lot of work, and so is the scanning.

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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2020, 04:37:32 PM »

Rick, I would love to have copies. 

Bill (Ret'd USN patrol plane navigator/communicator)
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w8khk
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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2020, 03:29:24 PM »

I  scanned each page of the ART-13 document to a PDF, then used a PDF merge utility to combine into a single file, approximately 35 megabytes in size.

I compressed the file to .ZIP format, which reduced it to 34 megabytes.  It seems that a 1 megabyte reduction in size is hardly worth the effort.

AMfone allows file attachment of three files, limited to 5 MB each.  I welcome suggestions for convenient sharing methods, perhaps hosted by Patrick on the Bunker of Doom?  If I break it into 6 separate .PDF files, it could be saved on via two posts on the AMfone.net printed material category, but that seems rather inconvenient for readers.  I do not presently have a web hosting resource here, but I expect to in the near future.  The problem with posting a web link on AMfone or QRZ is that over time, web links change, or the web server is retired, leaving bunches of broken links.

Ideas and suggestions are welcome.  I did not yet scan the first three weeks of training, around 50 pages.  It will be completed soon.  Other interesting documents will likely surface in the near future as well...

I sent the merged .PDF file via google drive to KD6VXI, KD5OEI, and W7TFO.

I know KA0HCP also expressed interest, but I was not able to locate a valid email address for him.
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Rick / W8KHK  ex WB2HKX, WB4GNR
w8khk
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2020, 11:35:33 PM »

Thanks to Patrick, KD5OEI, it is now available on the Bunker of Doom web resource here:

http://bunkerofdoom.com/lit/NavalTrainingART13.pdf
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Rick / W8KHK  ex WB2HKX, WB4GNR
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« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2020, 05:44:13 AM »

Thank you Rick, I appreciate your effort, in saving  and sharing this document.
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« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2020, 01:09:59 PM »

Rick,

After reading thru some of the training pages, I was amazed at how much detail these trainees had to learn about the ART-13.  Imagine knowing nothing about electronics and being presented with this in only three weeks time.

Were these recruits training to be aircraft communicators or were they destined to work in repair service depots?

My father was a signalman aboard a Navy ship in WWII. I got to see the training manuals (on the web) and was amazed at how involved it was. They needed to learn semaphore, Morse Code, wigwag and flaghoist signaling fluently.

The overall WWII military training was no cakewalk.

T
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« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2020, 01:20:27 PM »

Glad I could be of service in this effort  Smiley

I didn't get anything via drive...  That's OK though, I'll grab a copy off Patrick's site.

Thanks for putting it all together, should provide some good reading during the times of being on restriction.

--Shane
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w8khk
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« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2020, 10:32:58 PM »

Thanks Mike and Shane.

Shane, I sent the file via google drive to your email registered with your QRZ account.  Not sure why you did not receivethe file.  I made access to the link valid for anyone that had the link, not just the email distribution list.

Tom, I agree, the training was quite intense.  When I talked with dad about this long ago, he told me that the majority of folks in his classes had an electronics background; many hams and also BC engineers with 1st Radiotelephone and 1st Radiotelegraph licenses volunteered for navy radioman duty.  Most of his students would then service the equipment on the aircraft as well as in the flight-line shop.  He said a detailed, well-rounded understanding of the systems was critical to quickly and accurately diagnose and repair the root cause of the problem.  They did not have the inventory or time to parts-swap to diagnose.  That is why they learned more about the related systems in the aircraft, and not just the radio equipment per-se.

I recall in the six years I spent in the USAF, only 4 weeks in basic, then 4 months studying fundamental electronics (a walk in the park for hams like me) then 8 months on the Phantom F4C and F4D Radar, Comm/Nav, IFF, and Weapons Release Computer systems.  We studied all the systems down to the component level and did troubleshooting of actual failures, and effected the required repairs.  Upon completion of the training, we were ready and confident to deal with the maintenance and calibrations, both on the flight line and in the shop.  My last two years was spent in PMEL, working on specialized Phantom maintenance equipment, as well as much HP and Tek instruments.  I do not think it had changed that much, except that the systems in the 60s were much more modular, and the maintainability was built into the systems design.
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Rick / W8KHK  ex WB2HKX, WB4GNR
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