Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /homepages/11/d132647312/htdocs/Amfone/mkportal/include/SMF/smf_out.php on line 47
Need help to ID this Tube




 
The AM Forum
December 15, 2018, 07:10:29 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Links Staff List Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Need help to ID this Tube  (Read 1055 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
k5ygc
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« on: February 16, 2018, 03:07:00 PM »

Rectifier but what number?  Mark K5YGC


* rect.JPG (879.87 KB, 1088x1920 - viewed 152 times.)
Logged
W8ACR
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 605


Penta 254W


« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2018, 03:35:34 PM »

How many pins at the base? and can you show a pic looking down from the top?
My guess at this time is either an 80 or an 83.
Logged

The AM voice of Knox, North Dakota
k5ygc
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2018, 04:10:05 PM »

Eight pin I have a 83 here looks nothing like it. I have search the web no luck finding one with the piece around the bottom o the plates. Pic of top attached.


* top rect.JPG (852.69 KB, 1088x1920 - viewed 100 times.)
Logged
W8ACR
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 605


Penta 254W


« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2018, 04:48:28 PM »

Does the octal base have all eight pins present? Most common rectifiers only have five pins on the octal base. I don't recall seeing an internal structure like the one shown, but it may just be a variant of a common number.
Logged

The AM voice of Knox, North Dakota
W8KHZ
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 110



WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2018, 07:41:02 PM »

One trick I learned on tubes with the markings rubbed off... shine a really bright LED flashlight on the glass envelope. Often markings that are not visible in the ambient light are readily visible under the intense light of the LEDs.  Give it a try you might get lucky!

Brian  W8KHZ

Logged

Currently running a big homebrew transmitter (pair of 250THs modulated by a pair of 810s) paired up with a National HRO-50.  I also run a BC-610-I / NC-2-40D combo which is a lot of fun too.

Catch you on 75M AM!
KB2WIG
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4242



« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2018, 08:24:24 PM »



Breath deeply, exhale on envelope....it works.  Sometimes.

If you have a UV lamp, try illuminating the tube with the UV lamp.

good luck.

klc
Logged

What? Me worry?
W3NE
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 139


« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2018, 09:01:07 PM »

klc's reply above is an ancient but effective method to reveal faint tube types and date codes. Open your mouth wide and slowly exhale all over the envelope surface. Moisture in your breath will condense slightly differently where the old ink still remains, possibly making the type visible under the proper light.

Another oldie is to pass the tube lightly through your hair (if any). Natural oil in the hair might make the tube type stand out.

An excellent source of information about tubes is The Tube Collectors Association www.tubecollectors.org/ where Lud Sibley, WB2EVN might be able to identify your tube from the photos.

Bob - NE
Logged
WA4WAX
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 213


« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2018, 09:12:20 PM »

Put the tube in the freezer fro about 10 minutes, then bring it out.

With luck, you will be able to read the latent stencil.


Matt
Logged
WA2IXP
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 43


« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2018, 09:24:49 PM »

Mark,
   Looks like its on a power supply chassis. As someone mentioned earlier octal rectifiers have unused pins missing to raise breakdown voltage between pins I think.  could it be a 6AS7 triode used as a shunt or series regulator. They actually had 2 triodes in parallel in the same envelope.  Another similar one was a 6080 but more modern in appearance. low mu very low plate resistance . If I recall one could see the grid structure between the plates and cathodes thru the glass. 
Logged
k5ygc
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2018, 05:33:34 AM »

Mystery solved turns out to be a 6AS7 exhaling on the tube worked. It is used on a power supply built on a rack mount Seeburg chassis and a huge Seeburg volt meter. A pair of OD3'S and 6sh7 and a 5U4 I googled the Seeburg model # and no luck finding any info on it. Thanks for all the help K5YGC Mark
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

AMfone - Dedicated to Amplitude Modulation on the Amateur Radio Bands
 AMfone 2001-2015
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.063 seconds with 18 queries.