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Collins 300G Tuning motors




 
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Author Topic: Collins 300G Tuning motors  (Read 1271 times)
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KD6VXI
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« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2017, 05:03:59 PM »

Two thoughts.

If their is a raised relief on one side, matching an indent on the opposite surface with the spring between them, I'd say that's for a slippage type clutch... Keeps the gears from eating themselves up.

If it's a gear with another gear that slips inside, that can be a 2 speed clutch.  If the motors hit full inertia, possibly then develop enough centrifugal force to overcome the spring pressure and change the gear ratio....  One of my old remote controlled cars had a 2 speed transmission like that.  It would hit a specific speed and shift.  You set the speed by changing the spring inside.

Or I'm out in left field.

--Shane
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KB3WFV
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« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2017, 01:10:22 AM »

..(snip).... but the motor may have a shaft that moves forward when powered, like a starter in a car..(snip)...  
Fred

Right Fred, the motor shaft moves forward when power is applied to the motor. BTW I picked up a bottle of 3 n 1 oil tonight. Sadly it's a plastic bottle, I'm gonna miss the sound the metal can made when you squeezed it to apply the oil.

Two thoughts.

If their is a raised relief on one side, matching an indent on the opposite surface with the spring between them, I'd say that's for a slippage type clutch... Keeps the gears from eating themselves up...(snip)....

--Shane
KD6VXI

Hi Shane, Thanks for the comments. Between You and Fred I think I have it figured out. Attached is a photo of the motor shaft with the pieces on it.

NOTE: THE PIECES ON THE SHAFT ARE IN THE WRONG ORDER IN THIS PHOTO

The correct order should be from RIGHT to LEFT starting at the motor body.

Pin in shaft
A washer ? (blurry picture)
A gear ? (blurry picture)
Spring
Hub
Gear
Washer
Felt washer

In the photo you can see the felt and the washer are in the wrong place (right of the hub and left of the spring). They should be left of the hub and the gear. Sorry I don't have a photo of the correct order (yet).

Understanding:
1) The correct order
2) The motor bolts to a plate (see photo of capacitor assembly with motor).
3) The tip of the motor shaft sticks through a hole in the plate
4) When the motor is installed on the plate the teeth of the left gear mesh with teeth of a gear in the gear box.

It is easy to see that the motor shaft would move to the left (in this photo) or forward as Fred mention, when power is applied. Pushing the shaft through the hole in the plate.

This would push the gear closest to the motor body to the left (in the photo) towards the plate, compressing the spring in to the hub, the left gear, the washer and felt washer which are held in place by the plate.  

This allowss the gear on the right to engage with (I think) the hub. It might engage the gear on the left instead.

When all of the componets are compressed against the motor plate wall the gear on the left turns the gear box which turns the capacitor.

When power is removed the spring pushes the shaft back towards the motor disengaging the hub or outer gear.

This is probably done to prevent gear stripping as Shane had mention or more likely to prevent overshoot or backlash from the desired capacitor setting when power is remove from the ac motor. Overshoot or backlash can occur from motor momentum or a rocking back when the voltage is removed. In other words without this clutch set up one would play a constant game of "opps, too far" and "damn, not far enough".

I have two more motors to go through, as I work on them I will try to get a better picture of the motor shaft an it's parts in the correct order.

I am pretty sure this is the correct line of thinking, any thoughts ?

Brian
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KB3WFV
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« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2017, 06:32:30 PM »

  Smiley
A working Collins 300G Grid tuning motor.

https://youtu.be/QrG0ijAryvg
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KB3WFV
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« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2017, 10:28:34 PM »


A working Grid tuning motor with capacitor assembly

https://youtu.be/Iah9gJU1wMY

Now on to the slug tuning motors....

Brian
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KA2DZT
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« Reply #29 on: December 03, 2017, 12:30:28 AM »

Great, you got the whole thing working, pretty cool the way it works.

I was thinking about how much money Collins saved by not having to put knobs on the xmtr. Grin
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KB3WFV
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« Reply #30 on: December 03, 2017, 06:56:30 PM »

.......I was thinking about how much money Collins saved by not having to put knobs on the xmtr. Grin

Yep, I had the same thought. I wonder if Coolins was setting things up for future remote transmitter site control?

Brian
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KB3WFV
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« Reply #31 on: December 03, 2017, 07:05:49 PM »

A working slug tuning motor assembly.

https://youtu.be/YRCmaTxZHRM

I was really lucky with this one. No need to disassembly anything. All that had to be done was some cleaning and some good ole 3 IN ONE oil.

Now on to number 3 and the last motor. Will my luck hold out?

Brian
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Steve - K4HX
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« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2017, 08:32:16 PM »

That's the Collins way Fred - why make is simple when you can make it complex.
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