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FCC Affirms Huge Fine in New York Interference Case




 
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Author Topic: FCC Affirms Huge Fine in New York Interference Case  (Read 609 times)
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Steve - K4HX
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« on: October 15, 2017, 09:26:38 AM »

From the ARRL Letter:

FCC Affirms Huge Fine in New York Interference Case

10/11/2017

The FCC has affirmed a huge fine of more than $400,000 on Jay Peralta, a Queens, New York, man who has admitted to making unauthorized transmissions on New York City Police Department (NYPD) radio frequencies, maliciously interfering with officers’ communications. The FCC had sent Peralta a Notice of Apparent Liability (NAL) last April 14. Peralta, 20, is alleged to have transmitted false bomb threats, false claims of criminal activity involving firearms, false distress calls from purported NYPD officers, and threats against individual NYPD officers. The unauthorized transmissions began in 2016, according to the FCC.

“Mr. Peralta has not filed a response to the NAL,” the FCC said in an October 10 Forfeiture Order (FO). “Based on the information before us, we find no reason to cancel, withdraw, or reduce the proposed penalty, and we therefore assess the $404,166 forfeiture the Commission previously proposed in the NAL.”

The FCC has calculated the precise forfeiture at $404,166.

The FCC said the transmissions occurred from April through August 2016. The NYPD subsequently provided the FCC with a written statement by Peralta, who is currently in custody pending trial for related charges, in which he acknowledged making nine unauthorized transmission on the NYPD radio system, the FCC said.

“If such payment is not received within 30 days, the matter is referred to the Justice Department for collection,” the FCC said.

Peralta was arrested last fall along with two other men suspected of committing several robberies. According to news accounts, police found a cache of scanners and radios in one of the suspects’ homes.

The FCC said it was alerted by a Twitter post about an unlawful intrusion on the NYPD radio system and dispatched an Enforcement Bureau agent to check it out. On September 30, 2016, the NYPD contacted the FCC’s New York Office and advised that it had arrested Peralta and another individual in connection with unauthorized transmissions on NYPD’s radio system. According to police reports, the other individual arrested — Ricardo Torres, 29, described as “a ham radio enthusiast” in some news accounts — allegedly provided the radios used.

Torres, is said to hold an FCC General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) license. Police said they found 15 portable radios, 9 scanners, roof-top antennas, an amplifier, and assorted other electronics in Torres’s apartment.
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W3RSW
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Rick & "Roosevelt"


« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2017, 03:10:52 PM »

Boy you have to be really dumb or really wanting lifetime bad food and incarceration 'fun' to pull interference tricks to first responders in today's security atmosphere.
Your not supposed to leave a trail in these types of operations. Maybe he didn't realize RF emits a big trail.

Wonder how his legal help will plea bargain down the $400k ?

And here you have another instance where 'ham radio' is confused with ham radio.
Just delightful.  Undecided
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RICK  *W3RSW*
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2017, 07:41:56 PM »

He would've been just fine if he had just kept to whistling into his microphone on 75 meter SSB.

Jon
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K1JJ
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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2017, 09:28:41 PM »

Just another brick in the wall.

Probably another wacko wannabe with 15 antennas on his car and filled with VHF/UHF rigs and police monitors.

Over the years I've noticed there are way more seriously crazy people on the 2M repeaters than on HF.   Something about locals getting vendettas against other locals sparks them off.

After a brief two month exposure in 1975 - and then boredom set in, I never went back. Even the CB band is way more exciting to listen to... :-)

T
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W3NE
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2017, 10:21:43 AM »

Affirming a fine and collecting it are two entirely different issues. In the first place, the FCC does not collect fines; the Justice Depaertment does that, so we have typical D.C. inter-agency inefficiency to deal with. Second, the FCC has a sad history of beginning with a large, effective, fine and then reducing it to a fraction of the original fine when the perp pleads inability to pay. Finally, the Commission, with little basis, further reduces the fine and then arranges time payments!  There used to be more outrage and punishment over key clicks than the gross violations of today.

Bob - NE
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WA2SQQ
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2017, 03:23:42 PM »

From the ARRL Letter:

FCC Affirms Huge Fine in New York Interference Case

10/11/2017
"the other individual arrested — Ricardo Torres, 29, described as “a ham radio enthusiast” in some news accounts — allegedly provided the radios used. Torres, is said to hold an FCC General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) license. Police said they found 15 portable radios, 9 scanners, roof-top antennas, an amplifier, and assorted other electronics in Torres’s apartment.
Yes, collection is the key word! I personally found it offensive when the press release refereed to his accomplish as "Ham Radio Enthusiasts" than went on to say that the one person only held a GMRS license.
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WA2SQQ
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« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2017, 03:26:03 PM »

How do we get the FCC to take action against the outrageous behavior that's taking place daily on 7.200? It makes CB CH 19 look like the gentlemen band. What ever happened to self policing?
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W1RKW
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2017, 04:19:20 PM »

wonder if the FCC/Justice Dept. collected on K1MAN.
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Bob
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Steve - K4HX
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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2017, 06:42:26 PM »

Self policing never worked. The 7200 stuff has been going on (other frees and bands) for all of the 40 years I've been in amateur radio. Just don't listen. That's why God made VFOs and on/off switches.
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