Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /homepages/11/d132647312/htdocs/Amfone/mkportal/include/SMF/smf_out.php on line 47
How the Japanese cretaed transistors




 
The AM Forum
December 11, 2017, 11:39:46 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Links Staff List Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How the Japanese cretaed transistors  (Read 1031 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
WA2SQQ
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 450


« on: October 04, 2017, 02:31:48 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihkRwArnc1k&t=1263

I came across a very interesting video on how the Japanese electronics industry started. Some of their manufacturing techniques are almost comical. Find the time and check this out a very informative piece of video.
Logged
WD8BIL
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4182


« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2017, 03:57:12 PM »

I thought the Russians invented the transistor! Just ask Mr. Chekhov!
Logged
KA2DZT
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1999


« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2017, 10:32:06 PM »

I thought the Russians invented the transistor! Just ask Mr. Chekhov!


I thought I invented the transistor  just ask me.
Logged
w4bfs
W4 Beans For Supper
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1184


more inpoot often yields more outpoot


« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2017, 03:41:27 AM »

according to Harbaugh .... traveling nuns .... "Watch your step coming off the train sister"
Logged

Beefus

O would some power the gift give us
to see ourselves as others see us.
It would from many blunders free us.         Robert Burns
W3NE
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 135


« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2017, 12:12:01 PM »

Thanks for the link to that intersting video.
The Japanese did not have much to go on at that time so they did what they could to get a start in semiconductors. In the U.S., on the other hand, we had scientists (particularly at W.E. and Bell) who had rigorous academic backgrounds in the physics of semiconductor theory and methods of production. As we have seen, those conditions evolved to where we are today: the U.S. out of business with consumer electronics products but maintaing a diminishing lead in limited areas of advanced semiconductor design and production methods. Not funny.

Bob - NE
Logged
Steve - K4HX
Administrator
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2313



« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2017, 11:27:00 AM »

Are there any chip foundries left in the USA?

BTW, the original poster did not claim that the Japanese created the transistor.   Wink
Logged
W3NE
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 135


« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2017, 01:52:04 PM »

Quote
Are there any chip foundries left in the USA?

Inel comes to mind, for one. Also IBM and several smaller manufacturers are still strong in the U.S. In addition, some large foreign companies operate foundaries in some regions of the U.S. to take advantage of availability of skilled technical personnel and excellent schools of higher learning.
We haven't rolled over yet!

NE
Logged
w8khk
Marietta Georgia
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 755


You never heard of a Ham Operator?


WWW
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2017, 02:43:09 PM »

Are there any chip foundries left in the USA? ...snip...


Intel set up a fab plant on Garden of the Gods Road in Colorado Springs, CO, across the street from the HP -> Agilent Technologies plant where I was working back in 2000.  I was surprised to see they closed it down and sold the facility in November 2009.  The facility produced memory and interface chips, as well as the Centrino line of processors.
Logged

Rick / W8KHK  ex WB2HKX, WB4GNR
Global Warming? Actually, it's much worse! On any given day, half the planet faces global warming whereas the other half faces global cooling! The warming half is facing the sun, and the cooling half is opposite the sun
K6JEK
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1096


RF in the shack


« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2017, 11:36:35 PM »

Are there any chip foundries left in the USA?
...

There are still foundries in the US. I was surprised by just how many chip foundries there are in the world. I guess the world needs a lot of chips.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_semiconductor_fabrication_plants
Logged
Tom WA3KLR
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880



« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2017, 01:38:53 PM »

There have been/are a number of foundries in the northern Philadelphia suburbs.  Philco Corporation had one at their plant in the Horsham/Willow Grove area in the early 70s which became Allegro/Sprague.  I dont know if it is in operation today.  In Montgomeryville there was a company in the 70s called Solid State Scientific which I believe started by making the first CMOS digital watch chips.  They were also making bipolar rf power transistors being bought by the company I worked at the time, Narco Avionics.  That facility may have been taken over by a transistor production line there up to recently at least, their name escapes me at the moment, wont take the time to research .  Also in the same Montgomeryville area is a small company making infrared camera sensors.

Of course just north of Philadelphia in Allentown there is the Bell Labs foundry, became Lucent, now something else?  West of Allentown is a big foundry, changed names once at least, in operation.  As a result, there a quite a number of ASIC design groups in Fort Washington, Sellersville and Allentown areas that I know of.
 
So, these places can be very small and unassuming facilities today.  One new microwave amplifier foundry I learned of very recently is in Alburtis by Macungie, west of Allentown also.

There are a lot of electronics companies in the Boston area; the main i.c. leader there I think of is Analog Devices.  I presume they have some fabs there.

The Wikipedia link listed by Steve mentions Austin Texas and I also think of Colorado and the Phoenix Az area Motorola and On Semi; Ive been to the On plant.

And there used to be MSC? in Somerville NJ.  Again I don't know what is going on there now.

Semantics fabs foundry? Definition?
Logged

73 de Tom WA3KLR  AMI # 77   Amplitude Modulation - a force Now and for the Future!
Steve - K4HX
Administrator
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2313



« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2017, 04:35:27 PM »

I wonder how up to date that list is. I do see some 10 and 14u USA fabs on there, so those are likely still running.
Logged
ab3al
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8


« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2017, 08:06:05 PM »

intel still has a third party foundry in newark del.   did some work for them last month
Logged
WA1QHQ
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 89



« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2017, 09:45:05 AM »

Foundries... we are surrounded by them in the Boston area. They are making MMICs rather than large scale integrated circuits.

Mark WA1QHQ
Logged
WD5JKO
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1660


WD5JKO


« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2017, 12:33:17 PM »

Mergers and acquisitions are happening so fast it is hard to keep up. The oldest FAB in the world, was Fairchild in Portland, Me. They are now On Semi. In the same city was National Semi, which is now Texas Instruments. I have been going up to those fabs on occasion since 1983. It is funny how those two fabs recycle the same people back an forth. Larry NE1S retired from Fairchild.

The IBM fab in Fishkill, NY was given (not sold) to Global Foundries, and GF is a spin off from AMD when they went fabless. There is a huge GF complex in Burlington, Vt.

I work for a chip making company called Axcelis that is based in Beverly, Mass. and work in a remote office in Austin, Texas. This past week and next I will be working at NXP in Austin. NXP was Freescale, and before that was Motorola. In a few months, or early next year they will become Qualcom. Hard to keep up! NXP is a spin off from Phillips..

Back in the 1980's the Japanese were dominant in the semiconductor field. That is when the consortium called Semitech was started. I worked there too. Device line widths were over 0.3 micron (> 300 nm), and today we are quickly going down below 20nm, I hear that 7nm is not far off. A micron is a millionth of a meter.

Jim
Wd5JKO
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

AMfone - Dedicated to Amplitude Modulation on the Amateur Radio Bands
 AMfone 2001-2015
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.045 seconds with 18 queries.