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How often do you lose your posting?




 
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Author Topic: How often do you lose your posting?  (Read 8979 times)
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k4kyv
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Don
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« on: March 12, 2005, 01:54:07 AM »

Am I the only one who has ever composed a message, then previewed it, but then forgot to hit the submit button until I had advanced to another page and noticed that the message didn't get posted, and by then the message had expired in the cache and thus evaporated?

I've done that more times than I even want to think about.

GRRRRR!!!!
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

- - -
This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
W8ER
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2005, 06:05:24 AM »

Don,

I can't say that I've ever had that happen. I have accidentally hit some key (I don't know which one it is) and cleared the message entirely though!

What you might consider doing (since it is happening to you often) is write your reply in Notepad. When you are ready to post it, use cut and paste to put it into the window.

--Larry
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Steve - WB3HUZ
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2005, 11:50:14 AM »

Composing off-line or in another application is a good idea for other reasons. I find the Web form text box a little confining and not real friendly for editing. And, if you don't have system wide spell checking (and other useful text services for editing, formating and the like), use an off-line app that does.

I don't think composing off line is going to help Don to remember to hit the Submit button (I've done this too, but never lost the text). But, at least he won't lose his text, unless he cans the Notepad (or whatever) window.
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W8ER
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2005, 09:29:13 PM »

Quote from: Steve - WB3HUZ
I don't think composing off line is going to help Don to remember to hit the Submit button (I've done this too, but never lost the text). But, at least he won't lose his text, unless he cans the Notepad (or whatever) window.


No but It sure will help to keep him from retyping his thoughts! :shock:

Writing a reply or a post is tough if you are a "huntin pecker" like me. Since my typing habits force me to look at the keyboard while I am typing, I get lost if I sneeze or something like that!  :oops:

My spelling skills, while not terrible are also a factor. Using some other program to compose a post is a good solution for me too. It gives me a nice big screen to display my work, it gives me a spell checker and a few other utiliters too.

The other thing it does is when my wife yells or the dog wants to go out, I simply hit the save button and can come back to what I have already completed without having to redo it. A nice feature!

Also if you are posting something that you want to be sure some other guy sees, you can open your email program and paste it into the email screen too, not needing to rewrite it!

Oh .. there go my secrets!
 Wink

-Larry W8ER
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k4kyv
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Don
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2005, 04:30:43 AM »

Quote from: W8ER
Writing a reply or a post is tough if you are a "huntin pecker" like me. Since my typing habits force me to look at the keyboard while I am typing, I get lost if I sneeze or something like that!


Here's the solution to your typing problems.  It took me about 3 weeks of practice, about 20 min. a day, to master touch typing.  A few more weeks and my speed was higher than it had ever been before.

I don't look at the keyboard, because with this system, it won't help!

http://www.gigliwood.com/abcd/

http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak/
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

- - -
This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
Steve - WB3HUZ
Guest
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2005, 03:56:49 PM »

If he practiced every day for three weeks, he would probably type better on any keyboard.

http://www.utdallas.edu/%7eliebowit/keys1.html


Larry, it's better to be a "Hunt and Pecker" that just a pecker. :evil:
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k4kyv
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Don
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2005, 08:35:19 PM »

I first learnt to type on a standard keyboard while in high school, using a do-it-yourself pamphlet that came with the typewriter.  I was eventually able to type maybe 30 wpm, but with many, many typos, and I always looked at the keys.  Before the advent of computers, I didn't even attempt to type a letter without a bottle of white-out in hand.   I suppose I managed to learn quite a few bad habits, using that simple book with no instructor.  At university level I took a typing course (mainly to get some required credit hours) and I was barely able to muster a C in the class.  My typing skills improved somewhat,  but I still made a lot of mistakes and once out of that class, always looked at the keys.  It is hard to unlearn bad habits.

I first heard about the Dvorak system in the early 60's; I found it interesting but at that time there were no machines available.  When I first got a Windows 95 computer in 1998, I noticed that the Dvorak layout was an option along with many foreign variations of the standard qwerty.  I found the website tutorial mentioned above, and over one summer I spent about 20 min. a day over about 3 weeks to master the keyboard, to the point of being able to type any text using any letter, but it was entirely by touch, since the letters printed on the keyboard don't match the actual letters typed.  I continued to use Dvorak for routine typing, and within a couple of months my speed had surpassed my semi-hunt/peck speed with qwerty.  I  have never timed it, but I would guess my typing speed is now about 50-60 wpm.

We use Apple computers at work, and while the older Macs did not include Dvorak, the later machines, including OSX, now feature it, so I now use it at work as well.  When I have to use a QWERTY machine, it is now strictly hunt/peck because I can no longer touch type at all on the old keyboard.   Some people claim to be "fluent" in both keyboards and say they can switch from one to the other like a bilingual person swithing languages, but I could never achieve that capability, so I let qwerty go, and good riddance.

Evidently both M$ and Apple have decided there is enough demand for Dvorak to include it as a standard feature on their machines.  With the computer, the limitations of mechanical typewriters no longer exist, and the Dvorak system is now available to anyone who wishes to learn it.

It would be interesting to see results of the studies cited in the article, if they were repeated today in the computer-age environment.
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

- - -
This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
k4kyv
Contributing Member
Don
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Posts: 10062



« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2007, 02:31:54 AM »

If he practiced every day for three weeks, he would probably type better on any keyboard.

http://www.utdallas.edu/%7eliebowit/keys1.html

One poorly written anti-Dvorak article has had more press in the last several years than the Dvorak keyboard itself. Written by Stan Liebowitz and Stephen Margolis, it has been published in journals, magazines, and web sites again and again and again -- even though The Dvorak Keyboard author Randy Cassingham debunked it years ago. Yet the authors still repeat the same tired old stuff again and again, as if they've never heard that many of the things they keep saying is plain wrong!

http://www.dvorak-keyboard.com/dvorak2.html
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

- - -
This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
n3lrx
Guest
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2007, 07:43:12 AM »

I've never had any formal training in typing. My experience has all been self taught. I also don't type in the formal fashion but I still can type as fast as most professionals do. It's gotten to the point that I rarely have to look at the keyboard at all. Even though I am what some purists consider to be a 'hunt and pecker' I use all ten fingers!

I tried a Dvorakian keyboard and it drove me absolutely insane. So I went straight back the the QWERTY keyboard. I'll stick withe what I can use why change now? I've been typing on a QWERTY since I was 12, and can't see any reason to change when I've become proficient at it. If I do.. Well, then I'll be a one finger hunt an pecker! LOL
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