Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /homepages/11/d132647312/htdocs/Amfone/mkportal/include/SMF/smf_out.php on line 47
Tube Broadcast Consoles




 
The AM Forum
June 05, 2020, 02:32:30 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Links Staff List Gallery Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tube Broadcast Consoles  (Read 20650 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
K0ARA
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 106


The Bull


« Reply #50 on: December 25, 2015, 10:29:24 PM »

Ahhhh  Shocked


* DSC00068.JPG (870.85 KB, 1920x1080 - viewed 265 times.)
Logged

Mike KōARA                99.9% AM
                 AMI  #1692
flintstone mop
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5031


« Reply #51 on: December 26, 2015, 09:57:36 AM »

Ahhhh  Shocked

FINALLY YES!!! nice layout....that was hard work......hand wiring....Zenith always mad ea point of their TV sets were hand wired.
Logged

Fred KC4MOP
flintstone mop
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5031


« Reply #52 on: December 26, 2015, 09:59:08 AM »

Here are some shots of the Collins 212B-2 I took in 2003. The lid lifts to get at the tubes. If you need to get to the underside of the modules you lift the front. It opens like a Buick front hood.

The three rack mount cabinets are (right to left) an unused transcription amp housing that now holds all of my PTT sequencing relays. Middle is the relay panel for the board. All original relays still working fine some 60 years old. On the right is the power supply. No porn for these. 8^)



Thanks Mike
all of those DAVEN pots
Logged

Fred KC4MOP
K7KWD
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 18



« Reply #53 on: December 30, 2015, 04:39:41 AM »

Sorry for the blurry pictures.

I have a Dynamote that is virtually identical to yours. I got the original tweed case as well, although your case appears to be in a bit better shape than mine. The case came stuffed with all the cables and other paraphernalia, including headphones. One nice bonus--it also contained ALL the original sales paperwork, including manual, receipts, and even a factory QC check sheet. It was made and sold in 1946.


* 1946dynamote.jpg (365.02 KB, 800x637 - viewed 239 times.)
Logged
KA3EKH
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 540



WWW
« Reply #54 on: December 30, 2015, 04:11:37 PM »

What do the outputs look like on them? I am going to assume that they are little mixers intended for live remotes. Back in the seventies and early eighties when I started in radio thatís how you did live remotes. We used Shure M-67 mixers that had two terminals on the back and you would call the phone company and set up a Dry Pair that was a signal pair with no voltage on it that would be connected to the remote location and terminated back at the station.  We had several dry pairs along with al the incoming phone lines tied back into engineering and all the dry pairs would show up on a patch field as just Tip and Ring and we would manually patch them thru to the studio that they were going to be used in. At the remote end there would just be a telephone line terminated into a block that we would attach to the mixer output directly. Because it was a balanced system and unless you had an issue with the phone line itself it all worked very well with good response and no hum, sometimes you would get a ground on the pair and when you did a test at the remote if that happened you would call the phone company and they would come and switch you to a different pair. And for all of this support by the phone company the station paid about only $6 per line to have it installed and operational for that remote. Back then engineers would go to the remote site and set everything up for the talent and also require at least one other engineer back at the studio for testing things from end to end. Once the phone company got out of the dry pair business we went to dial up remote mixers, small solid state mixers with a rotary dial or touch tone system or VHF/UHF remote Marti systems. Today most remote operations have migrated to digital systems that work across cell networks or TCP/IP systems that work over the internet.
Some of my first jobs in radio were setting up remotes and patching them thru back in engineering. The station that I was at back then had an Air, Interview, News and two production studios for the AM operation and a dinky little studio for there FM
Logged
flintstone mop
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5031


« Reply #55 on: December 30, 2015, 06:46:13 PM »

What do the outputs look like on them? I am going to assume that they are little mixers intended for live remotes. Back in the seventies and early eighties when I started in radio that’s how you did live remotes. We used Shure M-67 mixers that had two terminals on the back and you would call the phone company and set up a Dry Pair that was a signal pair with no voltage on it that would be connected to the remote location and terminated back at the station.  We had several dry pairs along with al the incoming phone lines tied back into engineering and all the dry pairs would show up on a patch field as just Tip and Ring and we would manually patch them thru to the studio that they were going to be used in. At the remote end there would just be a telephone line terminated into a block that we would attach to the mixer output directly. Because it was a balanced system and unless you had an issue with the phone line itself it all worked very well with good response and no hum, sometimes you would get a ground on the pair and when you did a test at the remote if that happened you would call the phone company and they would come and switch you to a different pair. And for all of this support by the phone company the station paid about only $6 per line to have it installed and operational for that remote. Back then engineers would go to the remote site and set everything up for the talent and also require at least one other engineer back at the studio for testing things from end to end. Once the phone company got out of the dry pair business we went to dial up remote mixers, small solid state mixers with a rotary dial or touch tone system or VHF/UHF remote Marti systems. Today most remote operations have migrated to digital systems that work across cell networks or TCP/IP systems that work over the internet.
Some of my first jobs in radio were setting up remotes and patching them thru back in engineering. The station that I was at back then had an Air, Interview, News and two production studios for the AM operation and a dinky little studio for there FM


I did some remotes for a college station in the 70's. I guess the M-67 were acceptable for the technology of that time to use for remote mixers, but I wouldn't be 10 feet near those things now. Shoved the audio down some pair of wires from the 'phone company. Really didn't sound that bad on the air. They switched the board to mono and no one knew the difference.

Fred
Logged

Fred KC4MOP
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

AMfone - Dedicated to Amplitude Modulation on the Amateur Radio Bands
 AMfone © 2001-2015
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.084 seconds with 18 queries.