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Just moving topics....Over Priced BA gear




 
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Author Topic: Just moving topics....Over Priced BA gear  (Read 13857 times)
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Steve W8TOW
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« on: February 18, 2005, 04:19:58 PM »

Just felt this needed to be here, not over at the For Sale Index....
but I think a good direction for folks to pursue is with "private" gatherings.
We know where they are, help out our fellow AMers by offering fair deals and strive to keep the rug merchants out.....they have already ruined most swaps, they own the internet, small private swaps are all that is left!
73 ol buzzard and tight wad steve w8tow



here here, I've been waiting for someone to step foreward and say something.
This is no different than any other item for sale in this country.
So many people like to lament "Oh the good ol days 15 years ago when you could buy a 75A4 for $200....sigh....."
Well, if that is what you miss, then bring it back!
Perhaps you all remember a particular guy in Michigan selling BA stuff for 10X the "real" value, well, he is out of biz now....!!! That is one down.

If you want others to appreciate a rig for what it really is (a nice old radio to enjoy using) and not sit on a shelf and look at it admireing your EBAY conquest, then help devalue the junk...
Sure a SX100 is a nice little Gen converage rig, but, really, ya gotta be insane to think it is worth $500 these days!
73 steve
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73  W8TOW
2ZE
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2005, 05:49:46 PM »

I just don't understand how people can piss and moan about the price of this BA gear, or any price for any gear for that matter.
I agree, E-pay has increased inflation on much of this stuff, but people are only paying what they feel it is worth to them. If they feel a 75A4 is worth 1000 bux, then they pay it. Many seller's at flea markets who try to get e-pay prices at hamfest's find fast enough that they won't get those prices, packup the gear and go home.
Having experienced a massive sell off of gear, I chose not to use the e-pay route, and sell to the AM community. I priced the gear at a very fair price, and sold all of it in a 2-3 month span.
 I can tell you from experience, I would never go this route again. We( my OM and I) made a nice profit from it, however 2 invariables happened:
1 - P&M'ing about how a piece of gear wasn't what they expected, even after I sent pictures and countless discriptions of the equipment, regardless of the price.
2 - Scumbags re-sold at a markup of 5-10x, people I thought I trusted.
I would say about 60% of all purchaser's were happy with their purchases, the other 40% either P&M'ed or flipped it.

Point is, e-pay offers sellers a venue to sell thier ware's, and obtain the best possible price, and offers buyer's an opportunity to purchase something they probably would never see at a fester.
It however, does not allow people to fill thier basements with $10 rig's anymore, and brag how they screwed some old timer over at a fester.

2ZE
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W1GFH
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« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2005, 06:07:05 PM »

Quote from: 2ZE

Many seller's at flea markets who try to get e-pay prices at hamfest's find fast enough that they won't get those prices, packup the gear and go home.


Seen this more and more recently. Collins stuff with BIG price tags on tables. Sure cuts down on the impulse buyers. Who goes to swap meets with a roll of $1000 bills in their pocket?
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K1MVP
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2005, 06:33:42 PM »

TOW,-- 2ZE,  

 The "rug merchants" have been around a long time. --even before
 "epay".
 I recall back in the 70`s at hamfests guys "crusin" and looking for
 stuff to see how cheap they could get it, just to turn around and
 resell it for a "tidy" profit.
 I recall coming down a lot on my price, on items (equipment, tubes)
 etc, because I thought I would be "helping" a fellow ham out, only
 to find that this guy was a professional "fleamarket broker",--get
 something for "nothin" to make a profit.--and couldn`t care less
 about ham radio.
 My policy, now is to ask a "fair price" (not obscene, or giveaway)
 and not assume anything about the buyer.
 Same goes for when I purchase,--I will make what I feel is a "fair"
 offer,--not an "inflated" or rediculously low one.
 As for epay,--I am real "careful", es usually shy away not only
 because of "inflated" prices, but "questionable" conditions and
 descriptions.
                                  73, Rene, K1MVP :neutral:

 p.s, Had a "stalker" at the last hosstraders, come out of "nowhere"
       to offer me a grand total of $100.00 for a mint HQ-129X just
       as I was loading up my truck at the end.
       My asking price was 150 bucks, which I thought was very
       reasonable.--told him no, es a few days later a guy called me
       es said he would be more than happy to pay $150 for a
       mint 129X.
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W8ER
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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2005, 07:43:51 PM »

Steve,

When you hear someone say that they miss the good old days when you could buy a 75A4 for $200, it usually means that "they" wish that they could buy a 75A4 for $200! That same person would never sell one for that!

I can appreciate your sentiment however. As a part of the northern Ohio Boatanchors group, I have seen a few pieces of very nice BA gear brought to the meetings and sold for reasonable prices. It is refreshing to see.

Ebay is not all bad either. We all tend to look at it as the scourge that ruined hamfests and drove up the price of old gear. In reality, Ebay is singlehandedly responsible for many basements and garages being cleaned out and many BA's that would have been lost to the dumpster, being resold into the ham radio community. The price is simply what it is worth to someone and because you or I might wish the price was less, well ... I would like to be driving a new Beamer too!

I thought about it a lot after I lost the bidding on a 3880 FT-243 crystal, new in the box, on Ebay. Some well known singer paid in excess of $50 for it. I thought how crazy but if that's the price he was willing to pay, the seller would have been crazy to take my measly $30 bid for it. It all depends on your perspective Steve.


--Larry W8ER
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Pete, WA2CWA
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2005, 08:02:42 PM »

Quote
If you want others to appreciate a rig for what it really is (a nice old radio to enjoy using) and not sit on a shelf and look at it admireing your EBAY conquest, then help devalue the junk...

Don't hold your breath on this one.
Using your thought process, if I put my SX-100 on ebay, maybe the bidding will go up to $300, $500, or $800 ($820 has been the top bid for a SX-100), but, I'll be a nice guy, and take it to a local flea market where maybe, after some chewing down, I might get $125 to $150 for it. Duh, makes a lot of sense to me.

Unless a person is under pressure (going to marry, going to die, going to the moon, etc.) to sell off equipment very quickly, today's market selling environment provide a wider variety of choices for maximum "bang for the buck" whether you're a "rug merchant" or just cleaning out the basement.
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« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2005, 10:41:33 PM »

Without B-Bay I could have never built the last rig I put together in two years time. There is just no other place to find this stuff. I paid some large money for some of the items but most of the time if I saw something I just put my best offer on it and if I won, good, if not, there were probably 3 more posted over the weekend anyway. Without e-bay the old buzzards would pass it to the kids who would chuck it into the dumpster. Now they post it on line and take what the market will pay. I'll probably do the same thing sooner or later. It's still true that If someone I know needs something I have, I'll usually sell it cheap or just give it to them. If they "make AM" with the parts, they are usually welcome to them.
Keith
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w3jn
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2005, 07:49:56 AM »

People will pay whatever they feel something is worth.  I've gotten a 75A4 (with 3 filters and spinner knob) for $250, and after the initial rush (and a few hours operating it) I felt ripped off.  Turned it at the next hamfest (for a profit, mind you!).

I fail to understand why it's somehow sinful to make a bit of money out of the hobby.

I buy junk, spend a LOT of time getting it working, aligning it, cleaning it, and sell it for a MODEST "profit" (which is NO profit at all considering the time I've spent on it).  Why do I do this?  (1) subsidizes my hobby (2) Wife sees me making a bit of money so she's wholly supportive (3) I love doing it!  There are a lot of guys that don't want to be bothered with the restoration and repair, they just want a nice radio.  Were I to charge them even $10 an hour to restore their turdball, they wouldn't be able to afford it.

That said, if I get a deal from a buddy, it's because that particular radio is going into the collection, and if I decide I have to get rid of it, the buddy that I got it from has first rights to buy it back.   Ruining a friendship for the sake of a few bux makes no sense, IMHO.

73 John
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K1MVP
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« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2005, 09:41:27 AM »

Quote from: w3jn
People will pay whatever they feel something is worth.  I've gotten a 75A4 (with 3 filters and spinner knob) for $250, and after the initial rush (and a few hours operating it) I felt ripped off.  Turned it at the next hamfest (for a profit, mind you!).

I fail to understand why it's somehow sinful to make a bit of money out of the hobby.

I buy junk, spend a LOT of time getting it working, aligning it, cleaning it, and sell it for a MODEST "profit" (which is NO profit at all considering the time I've spent on it).  Why do I do this?  (1) subsidizes my hobby (2) Wife sees me making a bit of money so she's wholly supportive (3) I love doing it!  There are a lot of guys that don't want to be bothered with the restoration and repair, they just want a nice radio.  Were I to charge them even $10 an hour to restore their turdball, they wouldn't be able to afford it.

That said, if I get a deal from a buddy, it's because that particular radio is going into the collection, and if I decide I have to get rid of it, the buddy that I got it from has first rights to buy it back.   Ruining a friendship for the sake of a few bux makes no sense, IMHO.

73 John


John,
 I agree with you,--I see no problem in making a "modest" profit,
 especially when you invest time and work to "resurrect" a piece
 of equipment.
 It is time-consuming and work to bring back a piece of equipment
 that has been has not been cared for over the years.
 And usually any offer that is made on a BA would usually reflect
 the condition it`s in and how much work it would take to restore
 it to "usable" or good condition.
 Abslolutely nothing wrong with that(making an offer based on its
 overall condition)
 And a seller does have a "right" to ask what he wants, even if the
 price is "inflated"--wether he get it(the price) is another matter.

                                         73, Rene, K1MVP
 
 P.S, Does anyone know how long the "radiofinder" has been out
        of business?(am sure he was in a "tough" situation,--trying
         to make a profit restoring BA`s)
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xe1yzy
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« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2005, 11:21:08 AM »

Quote from: Steve w8tow

So many people like to lament "Oh the good ol days 15 years ago when you could buy a 75A4 for $200....sigh....."


Steve...

Without a doubt is a Market affair...

Here the prices I paid for some of my Botanchors in Mexico last year...
in USD equivalent

Collins 32G circa 1936  $60
Collins 32V3.............. $ 100
Viking Valiant............  $ 80
Collins 30L1 .............  $ 170


Any Idea for yours next Vacations trip guys?  :mrgreen:
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k4kyv
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Don
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« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2005, 12:42:29 PM »

Quote from: xe1yzy


Here the prices I paid for some of my Botanchors in Mexico last year...
in USD equivalent

Collins 32G circa 1936  $60
Collins 32V3.............. $ 100
Viking Valiant............  $ 80
Collins 30L1 .............  $ 170


Any Idea for yours next Vacations trip guys?  :mrgreen:


Years ago I recall reading lists of AM broadcast stations in various countries, and the list of low power (<1KW) Mexican stations was long.  I have often wondered how many pre-WW2 transmitters might still be sitting around somewhere in an old building after the station went dark, or a new transmitter was purchased.  I used to hear several commercial Mexicans on the 25m shortwave band during the day, but they are apparently no longer on the air.  Wonder what happened to those old transmitters.

If I had more free time, a little better command of Spanish and some knowledge of political situations that might exist in various localities of the country, I would consider an expedition south of the border to see if I could sniff out some of  those old rigs.  I suspect Mexico is less a throw-away society than the US, and a few of those old rigs could still be stored away somewhere, dusty, but still in salvageable condition, instead of at the bottom of a landfill, and some of the owners might be willing to part with them if offered what they would actually be worth to an AM ham.

If anyone can find a 1950's vintage White's Radio Log, it listed all Mexican, US and Canadian stations by QTH, callsign and power, and I recall a long list of low-power stations in Mexico, many of them apparently in existence since the 1930's.  It wouldn't be difficult to figure out likely sites where antique broadcast transmitters, no longer in use, might still be sitting.
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« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2005, 02:47:42 PM »

Quote from: 2ZE

It however, does not allow people to fill thier basements with $10 rig's anymore, and brag how they screwed some old timer over at a fester.

2ZE


Sounds like you heard the same guy bragging on the air about how he got his transmitter the other day. Yup, we need more guys out there helping out old folks who can't lift boatanchors by paying them pennies on the dollar. I sometimes wonder if these folks own a mirror. Same goes for the guys who will jump at the chance to buy a rig at fire sale prices from "some old friends" who need money fast.
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k4kyv
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« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2005, 04:28:42 PM »

We were spoilt by the post WW2 era of cheap surplus components and equipment, and the early SSB era (circa 1963-70) when vintage equipment was considered worthless junk. I recall when it was very easy to find kw modulation transformers at hamfests for $10, and large triode transmitting tubes such as 250T's, 450T's, 833A's etc. for $5 each (they were "worthless" for amateur use because they didn't make good "linears"). Despite the then-recent implementation of Incentive Licensing, which was supposed to reverse the trend, homebrewing was falling out of favour with the amateur community, and nice old homebrew rigs could be had for a song if you could get them before they were transported to the landfill. Appliance operating had become the order of the day, and loose transmitting components were looked upon as junk. I often heard others laugh and make derisive remarks as I passed by, lugging a large transformer or other goodie through a hamfest fleamarket.

Sometimes the vendors simply didn't know what they were disposing of. In 1970 while I was building a KW AM transmitter, I had a 5-25 Hy 1 amp swinging choke in one of the HV plate supplies, and needed an identical choke for the other one. That choke was still listed in catalogues for a little over $100 each (1970 dollars). At a hamfest that summer, I spied that exact choke, model number and all, lying in about 2" of water in a mud puddle under a vendor's table. It was sparkling new, obviously just unwrapped from the original box that morning. After inspecting it, I affected a somewhat dumb sounding speech characteristic and asked the guy, "will you take a dollar for that ol' transformer lookin' thing under the table?" The guy almost jumped at the chance to say "yes" before I changed my mind. I gave him the dollar bill and walked away with the prize choke, still in perfect mint condition after I had wiped away the mud and dried it off. It is still in service in one of my rigs today.

In the early 1980's I ran the service department of a two-way commercial radio sales/service outlet. They also retailed amateur equipment and ran monthly display ads in QST. Commercial advertisers get an "inspection copy" of QST about two weeks before the normal subscribers get their monthly issue, so I always had an advance peek at the classified "ham-ads." One month, I spied a 75A4 for sale, "best offer." I phoned the guy immediately, and found that he was unlicensed, a lawyer who had just gone through a passing interest in amateur radio, and who wanted to get rid of some "old equipment" he had accumulated. He stated that the 75A4 was in good condition except for a "cracked tuning knob", and had all 3 stock filters. I made him a starting offer of $100, figuring he would want a lot more money, but that we would be able to eventually agree on a reasonable price. Surprisingly, he immediately accepted my first offer, and I had a m.o. in the mail that day. About a week later the 75A4 arrived just as he described it, except that the "cracked knob" could better have been described as a mosaic.

The receiver had the 4:1 vernier/spinner knob assembly, but it looked like the knob had been crushed with a sledgehammer and the pieces crudely epoxied back together. It still functioned, but the pieced-together spinner knob had a severe wobble. I took off the knob, noticing that someone had replaced the original setscrew with a roundhead Phillips screw. When I got the knob off, I discovered that a previous owner had attempted to remove the vernier mechanism from the shaft, apparently using an Allen wrench to turn the setscrew that took a "Bristol" spline wrench. They had rounded out the splines, and then apparently attempted to grab the head of the setscrew with a diagonal cutter, and succeeded in shaving off the protruding portion of the setscrew. The setscrew was located on a brass bushing that is inside the main internal-toothed gear of the mechanism, and I eventually concluded that it was imposssible to remove the screw, so I just ended up carefully filing away the brass bushing until the gear assembly slipped off. Of course the 4:1 mechanism was ruined, but I had an original 1:1 ratio Collins knob in my junkbox, so I installed it on the receiver. At least I had a solid, original tuning knob, but without the 4:1 reduction feature. Now I understood why the seller was so quick to accept my $100 offer. He thought he was ripping ME off!

After a little tweaking, the receiver worked well, but the 1:1 tuning ratio was too fast for my comfort. Then, a few months later, I discovered in the old "Ham Trader Yellow Sheets" a replacement 4:1 vernier assembly for sale for $35. I immediately called the guy, and arranged the purchase, luckily before anyone else had called. When it arrived, I had a brand-new, old stock Collins vernier dial kit, still unopened in its original box, with even the near-microscopic washers and other miniscule parts each sealed in its own postage-stamp size manilla envelope with the Collins part number stamped on the outside. The only damage was minor: the bakelite vernier tuning knob over the years had reacted with the plastic bag it was sealed in, relulting in some rough spots etched on the skirt. I installed the new vernier mechanism per the instruction booklet included in the kit, and it worked perfectly, as expected.

Not bad, a working 75A4 with all three stock filters and brand new vernier spinner knob assembly, for a grand total of $135. I'm  sure today's trophy collectors would pay several times that figure on e-Pay just for the virgin vernier knob kit, merely to display on the shelf, unopened, as "Collins NOS."

I prefer not to sell radio stuff for cash.  I always feel that if I ask what it is really worth, factoring in time I may have put into it, it will appear overpriced, and no doubt I will be accused of being a greedy rug merchant.  Besides, money is money; it all looks and feels the same, no matter what the source, and I already have a steady source of income.  If I sell a valuable and irreplaceable piece of radio equipment, it is gone, for ever, and the equivalent amount of cash will likely end up having no significant impact on my personal finances 12 months down the  road.  Instead, I prefer to trade irreplaceable pieces of radio stuff that I don't think I will need, for someone else's piece of irreplaceable radio stuff that I do need, and will very likely still be using 20 years from now.
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« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2005, 05:27:03 PM »

Quote from: K1MVP


 p.s, Had a "stalker" at the last hosstraders, come out of "nowhere"
       to offer me a grand total of $100.00 for a mint HQ-129X just
       as I was loading up my truck at the end.
       My asking price was 150 bucks, which I thought was very
       reasonable.--told him no, es a few days later a guy called me
       es said he would be more than happy to pay $150 for a
       mint 129X.


Totally agree with you, your price was fair and reasonable. The "make an offer when they're packing up for the day" technique was always used by me to make REASONABLE offers based on what the gear is WORTH, not petty "let's see if I can save myself $20" ones.

However, it's kinda sad to see how the hobby has been changed by eBay. These days, it seems that ANY offer made on ANY gear at ANY swapmeet  brings the following response from the seller: "Are you kidding? You know how much I could get for it on eBay??"
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2005, 06:30:31 PM »

Don, KYV wrote:

Quote
Not bad, a working 75A4 with all three stock filters and brand new vernier spinner knob assembly, for a grand total of $135.


Overpriced, IMHO.
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« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2005, 07:03:44 PM »

Quote from: W1GFH
The "make an offer when they're packing up for the day" technique was always used by me to make REASONABLE offers based on what the gear is WORTH, not petty "let's see if I can save myself $20" ones.


More often than I like to admit, I have passed up a hard-to-find item at a hamfest because it was a few bucks over my "limit,"  later to regret not biting the bullet and spending the extra $5 or $10 that stood between my maximum and the sellers minimum.  The item is now  long gone, with little likelihood of ever finding another.  Yet the little bit of extra money I could have put out would not have made one iota of difference in my financial situation as it now stands.

One thing that has changed over the years is that I used to shop at hamfests to find "bargains", but now I shop to find stuff that is nominally  unobtainable at any price, anywhere.
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« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2005, 08:28:10 PM »

Quote from: 2ZE
I would say about 60% of all purchaser's were happy with their purchases, the other 40% either P&M'ed or flipped it.


2ZE


Mike,
      Considering the fair prices you and your father asked for stuff, I can't conceive how anyone would P&M about anything they bought from you. I dropped a nice piece of change, and felt that you and your pop treated me like royalty!!!

I rode home in a truck packed with gear - you know what I mean. We drove from your house to mine with the suspension of the truck on it's stops the entire way home (8-9 hours)! On top of that I had people pick up stuff I couldn't fit.

I'm EXTREMELY satisfied with EVERYTHING I got. If it didn't work when I first got it, I got it working in due time, including the HB superhet that was built in 1938 by a friend of your family. You can come over and see literally everything is still in my shack, and will continue to be for many years to come.

Maybe I'm a romantic old fart, but some things you just can't put a price on. EVERY transmitter has the charasteristic Zed-M audio built in, and the level of craftsmanship built into the recondomized Gates (807X 2X46) PW 75M rig is unbelievable. I know it's PW, but just love to use it with a plethora of like receivers. To me, some stuff is priceless. Not only do you get the rig, but the blood, sweat and ingenuity of the man who built it! Another example is the 'W8HVE" rig. I could go on and on.

Th point I'm trying to make is that everything was priced fairly. This doesn't happen all the time, but when gear is offered to the AM community by other members of the AM community, it's usually priced fairly, and both parties make out.

Just my two cents worth.......
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« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2005, 11:14:08 PM »

Quote from: W1GFH


However, it's kinda sad to see how the hobby has been changed by eBay. These days, it seems that ANY offer made on ANY gear at ANY swapmeet  brings the following response from the seller: "Are you kidding? You know how much I could get for it on eBay??"




 And what I, es another ham friend of mine say to the seller who says
"I can get XXX on Ebay", is "go for it"-- this is NOT "epay", this is
 hosstraders.                  
                                     73, K1MVP :neutral:
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« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2005, 12:05:00 AM »

Quote from: k4kyv

Years ago I recall reading lists of AM broadcast stations in various countries, and the list of low power (<1KW) Mexican stations was long.  I have often wondered how many pre-WW2 transmitters might still be sitting around somewhere in an old building after the station went dark, or a new transmitter was purchased.  I used to hear several commercial Mexicans on the 25m shortwave band during the day, but they are apparently no longer


Viking Valiants were used as a small brodcast transmitters in small towns of Mexico years ago, at the 50'S a lot of homebrew brodcast equipment was fabricated using the surplus WWII transmitters.  there is not more Mexican short wave stations, the last one "Radio Mexico" was  shut down last years, "not more shortwave listeners, today everybody are using internet" and pull it down the switch!  do you have an Idea where I can find the 1950's vintage White's Radio Log?

And if you really wants to come over, you  have a friend here,count with me  as a tourist  guide and translator.
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« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2005, 02:01:48 PM »

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do you have an Idea where I can find the 1950's vintage White's Radio Log?

They're on ebay often. Here's two up there now:
1952-1953
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=132&item=6512682698&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW
1947
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=132&item=6512640684&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW
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Pete, WA2CWA - "A Cluttered Desk is a Sign of Genius"
k4kyv
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« Reply #20 on: February 20, 2005, 02:08:32 PM »

Quote from: xe1yzy
do you have an Idea where I can find the 1950's vintage White's Radio Log?

And if you really wants to come over, you  have a friend here,count with me  as a tourist  guide and translator.


I'll see if I can find one of my old ones and send you a xerox copy.  They appeared in quarterly radio magazines (Radio-Electronics or Electronics Illustrated if I remember correctly).  

Maybe I could take you up on your offer after I retire 3-4 years from now, or someone else on this board, sooner.  I am interested in homebrew or commercial AM broadcast transmitters up to 1 kw, built before WW2.

Thanks & 73

Don K4KYV
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

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k4kyv
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« Reply #21 on: February 20, 2005, 02:11:50 PM »

Snipped from a posting on another BB:


Quote
... in Orlando last Friday... The outdoor fleamarket was perhaps 1/4 the size of the Hosstraders hamfest in Hopkinton, NH, just for reference. Some of the
items seen were: Collins 75A-4 w/speaker for a mere $3K, a decent
SP-600 for $495 (owner says he had turned down an offer of $350
earlier), two Collins 30S-1 amps for $1650 and $1750, and a BC-939(?)
antenna tuner for the BC-610 in so-so shape for a mere $400. Big Gates
console for $400. Homebrew quad of what looked like 3-500Z transmitter
for '10 meter AM or FM' for $1500, a D-104 (nothing special, 1980s
model with push bar on base and japanese aftermarket lever on side
bar) for $250, another next to it with no lever for $150. Also saw a
Halli transmitter and receiver set up (the numbers escape me, but they
look like the SR-150) with no price, 'make me an offer' by the owner...
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Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

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This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
W1GFH
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« Reply #22 on: February 20, 2005, 03:07:12 PM »

Quote

items seen were: Collins 75A-4 w/speaker for a mere $3K, a decent
SP-600 for $495 (owner says he had turned down an offer of $350
earlier), two Collins 30S-1 amps for $1650 and $1750, and a BC-939(?)
antenna tuner for the BC-610 in so-so shape for a mere $400. Big Gates
console for $400. Homebrew quad of what looked like 3-500Z transmitter
for '10 meter AM or FM' for $1500, a D-104 (nothing special, 1980s
model with push bar on base and japanese aftermarket lever on side
bar) for $250, another next to it with no lever for $150. Also saw a
Halli transmitter and receiver set up (the numbers escape me, but they
look like the SR-150) with no price, 'make me an offer' by the owner...


This is what I'm talking about: the eBayization of all noncommercial transactions. It happens even at yard sales now...

ME: $100 for a box of macaroni and an
old toilet plunger?

SELLER: Are you kidding? I could get
$300 if I put them on eBay! I

ME: But this ain't eBay!

SELLER: I know. That's why I knocked $200
off the eBay price! I figure I'd give people
a break.

Is this a good thing? Personally I don't think so. But that's just my opinion. When I ask other people their opinions on it, I find they fall into two categories. (a) Those who have had one or two experiences making a surprisingly nice profit on eBay - generally approve of the system, and (b) those whose only experience is as buyers - generally disapprove of the system.
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« Reply #23 on: February 20, 2005, 03:53:51 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supply_and_demand
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K1MVP
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« Reply #24 on: February 20, 2005, 04:16:59 PM »

Quote from: Dave Calhoun W2APE


Hi Dave,
WOW, I guess I will have to remember all this the next time I make
an offer on a BA at the next hamfest I go to.
Does this info also take into account the guy who will pay "anything"
just because he HAS to have it no matter what the item is worth?
I guess when the Uncle Sam, back a few years ago paid $500 to
$1000 for hammers and toilet seats,--the taxpayer was really getting
a "good deal" after all.--Probably would have cost a lot more on EBAY.

                                       73, Rene, K1MVP   :neutral:
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