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Antares Launch to ISS - TOMORROW, 27 Ocotber




 
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Author Topic: Antares Launch to ISS - TOMORROW, 27 Ocotber  (Read 11549 times)
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Steve - K4HX
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« on: October 26, 2014, 10:08:50 PM »

Don't miss it: 6:45 p.m. EDT (2245 GMT).

Looks like many of us will have clear WX.

http://www.universetoday.com/115565/how-to-watch-spectacular-1st-nighttime-antares-launch-to-iss-on-oct-27-complete-viewing-guide/
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KA3VID
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2014, 10:59:32 PM »

Thanks Steve will have to give this a look see.Hopefully it's within our viewing range in York , PA.
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Steve - K4HX
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« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2014, 08:06:21 PM »

The launch of Orbital Sciences' Antares rocket carrying its Cygnus cargo spacecraft has been scrubbed. The range remained red because of a boat down range in the trajectory Antares would have flown had it lifted off.
 
Launch has been rescheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 28, at 6:22:38 p.m. EDT. The launch window is about 10 minutes long.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/home/
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Todd, KA1KAQ
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« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2014, 09:06:03 PM »

Couldn't believe it. Looked like they were going to launch once the boat cleared. They resumed the count and 2 minutes later scrubbed. Was looking forward to it since the ISS was coming over in the same directing at 6:49. Could've made for an interesting video. It'll still be pretty much daylight here at 6:22 tomorrow.

Did get a decent video of ISS and a few shots of a crescent moon with the remnants of a nice sunset, at least.


* Crescent.JPG (136.58 KB, 632x950 - viewed 573 times.)
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Steve - K4HX
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« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2014, 10:20:12 PM »

Beautiful and clear night tonight. I saw the ISS too. And the moon had a nice amount of earth shine early on. Very cool. Let's hope it's as clear tomorrow.

Damn boat.
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« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2014, 10:37:47 PM »

I saw a neighbor taking out the trash.
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Pete, WA2CWA
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« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2014, 11:59:01 PM »

My neighbor was wondering why I was standing in the street with binoculars.
In this metro area, there are lots of spots of light moving through the sky at that time of evening.
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Pete, WA2CWA - "A Cluttered Desk is a Sign of Genius"
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« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2014, 01:13:40 PM »

I live about twenty miles up the road from Wallops and have often watched the flights. Last one that I saw there were the twin flights for the Dynamo Ionosphere research project over the Fourth of July holiday. The family and I were on the beach at Chincoteague Island National park thatís just across Toms Cove next to the Mid Atlantic Regional Space port. Best place to watch all this sort of stuff is on the causeway out to Chincoteague Island, the little causeway from Chincoteague to the national park or at the beach in the park. Think the wife and I will head down there tonight after work.

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Todd, KA1KAQ
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« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2014, 06:24:34 PM »

Looks like it got about 100 feet or so off the pad before it fell back and exploded...
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« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2014, 06:34:49 PM »

yup... video was just on Abc nightly news
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kb3ouk
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« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2014, 07:02:18 PM »

I was watching NASA's video stream, sure looked like one heck of a crapout.
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Clarke's Second Law: The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is by venturing a little past them into the impossible
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« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2014, 10:12:36 PM »

http://www.weather.com/news/science/space/nasa-antares-rocket-explodes-launch-attempt-20141028?cm_ven=FB_SCI_JB_102814_18
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K4RT
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« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2014, 11:12:59 PM »

Standing in the yard at launch time with compass and binoculars, finally decided that it was too low to the horizon to see from here and went inside, then saw the news reports.  Boy was it ever too low. I wonder what the backup plan is for resupplying ISS.
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Pete, WA2CWA
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« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2014, 01:06:13 AM »

I hope it wasn't delivering food, toilet paper, or the September CQ magazine.
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« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2014, 08:11:14 AM »

 But it was, all of the above including the magazine TP.
20 day supply remaining on the ISS.

Shades of late '57, early '58. -The nadir of the Navy.

Our poor little grapefruit satellite suffered the same fate.
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RICK  *W3RSW*
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« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2014, 09:14:43 AM »

Left work late last night to head down to Wallops and about six twenty stopped just past the VA/MD state line to watch the show. Was listening to the control on radio and heard conformation of launch and six seconds in just after announcing that the first stage engine was at one hundred nine percent apparently the engine or some of the stuff around it failed and everything came back down. At about twenty seconds or so the range officer detonated the rocket for fear of the second stage solid booster taking off on its own.
Although I was still about ten miles away saw the flash that at first assumed was normal launch but did hear about thirty seconds of what sounded like continuous thunder.
By the time I got there still big fires over at the Mid-Atlantic Region Space port that was easily seen from the causeway. They cordoned off the entire aria for about two or so miles around the space port and just let all the fires burn themselves out and were supposed to be sending in crews this morning to put out any remaining fires and start the investigation. The Antares rocket has a first stage thatís powered by a Russian built liquid fueled engine that burns liquid oxygen and kerosene, the second stage is solid propellant and the payload module uses hydrazine and something else. Think hydrazine way toxic being that whenever itís encountered on the ground no one is allowed around and the people who work with it wear full body protective suites with external air supplies. Perhaps there was some concern that debris may be contaminated with that or some may still be floating around.
 There was some concern at one point that using thirty year old Russian engine may not be a good idea but they were remanufactured and tested so they were flight certified. There is no American built engine that can carry that size payload. For a long time LGM-25 (Titan 2) missile were being used for putting payloads into low earth orbit by NASA, NOAA and DMSP but think that they may have exhausted the supply of them that were on the shelf, donít know why some combination of that engine was not considered? Maybe use two or four of them instead of the one big Russian? Although imagine one big engine is less prone to catastrophic failure then a cluster of four?
Canít say too many bad things about the Russians though, they are the only way you can get to the ISS, and they have a progress resupply ship all ready to go. Back about twenty years ago there was a lot of grumbling at NASA about having to support the Russian space program and there backwards use of the same designs and insistence on building old technology. The Soyuz was designed in the sixties and is still being built and flow on a regular basis to ISS. Our manned programs are all relegated to the museums.
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kb3ouk
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« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2014, 06:38:14 AM »

From what I've seen of stuff that the Russians designed and built, they tend to go a little overkill with the size and durability, which is probably why those designs stick around so long.
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« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2014, 10:06:56 AM »

Military grade, actually for ICBM service, exact copies of Vonbraun's as illustrated in Colliers Mag. 1952 concept, successors to the A4 (V2) to be designated A5 had Germany been able to stay in the war longer.  The A5 was Designed to hit NYC with third stage added after war by USSR for satellite service.
..all of the above almost accurate but from the top of my head. Grin

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RICK  *W3RSW*
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« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2014, 09:52:19 PM »

Looks like some sats, including a couple of ones for amateur radio were lost.

From the ARRL Letter:

Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads Among Those Lost in Launch Explosion
The RACE and GOMX-2 CubeSats, both carrying Amateur Radio payloads, were among more than 2 dozen satellites lost after an unmanned Orbital Space Sciences (OSC) Antares 130 vehicle exploded spectacularly shortly after launch at 2222 UTC on Tuesday, October 28, from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The Antares is a new medium-class launch vehicle developed by OSC. The rocket exploded about 6 seconds after launch, sending a huge ball of fire hurtling toward the ground and igniting a massive fire at the NASA launch site.

"While NASA is disappointed that Orbital Sciences' third contracted resupply mission to the International Space Station was not successful today, we will continue to move forward toward the next attempt once we fully understand today's mishap," said William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Directorate. "The crew of the International Space Station is in no danger of running out of food or other critical supplies." Indeed, a smaller resupply mission, launched from Russia, reached the ISS the next day.

The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment (RACE) CubeSat was a joint project of The Texas Spacecraft Laboratory (TSL) at the University of Texas-Austin and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Built by a 30-student team, it carried a 183 GHz radiometer, a new science instrument designed by JPL. The spacecraft was equipped to transmit using GMSK at 38.4 k and CW telemetry on a downlink frequency of 437.525MHz.

TSL's Glenn Lightsey, KE5DDG, a UT engineering professor, oversaw the student project that worked hand-in-hand with NASA staff in creating a satellite that aimed to measure water vapor in Earth's atmosphere.

"It's unfortunate, but it is also part of the aerospace industry," Lightsey told the Texas Statesman newspaper. "The nature of building space vehicles is that it is not a 100 percent reliable process. Getting into space is really the hardest part."

The 2U GOMX-2 CubeSat was intended to test a de-orbit system designed by Aalborg University in Denmark. Karl Klaus Laursen, OZ2KK, is listed as the "responsible operator" on International Amateur Radio Union frequency coordination documents. The Amateur Radio payload proposed using a 9.6 k MSK data downlink on 437.250 MHz. Also on board was an optical communications experiment from the National University of Singapore. The mission also aimed to flight qualify a new high-speed UHF transceiver and SDR receiver built by an Aalborg University team.

The Antares 130 resupply mission was carrying some 5000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station. The Antares 130 also was carrying the Flock-1d array of 26 satellites as well as Arkyd-3 and Cygnus CRS-3. RACE, GOMX-2, and the other satellites were to be launched into orbit from the ISS later.
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Steve - K4HX
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« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2014, 11:38:19 PM »

Not pretty.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOePTJ9eSkQ&spfreload=10
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« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2014, 09:53:00 AM »

Looks like the shock wave hit them towards the end.  Viewed a couple of others adjacent on YouTube screen.

On the Western Front, looks like Virgin Galactic ain't so virgin anymore either.

Depressing.
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RICK  *W3RSW*
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« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2014, 10:20:38 AM »

Baumgartner's record may have been broken twice in the same time period?

HAS GOOGLEíS ALAN EUSTACE BEATEN FELIX BAUMGARTNERíS SKYDIVE RECORD? This was the headline October 27th. The 57-year-oldís attempt took place on Friday in New Mexico, with reports claiming that the search engine giant's senior vice president leapt from a large helium balloon at a height of 41,420m (135 892.3 ft) above the earth.

I wonder if the surviving pilot of Spaceship Two counts? How high were they? When the paired planes reached a height of about 50,000 feet, about 50 minutes later, SpaceShipTwo was released for the test. Probably not. Looks like it did not get any altitude.

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