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Best Meteor Shower - Dec 13 - This Thursday - Look for Little Green Men!




 
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Author Topic: Best Meteor Shower - Dec 13 - This Thursday - Look for Little Green Men!  (Read 2787 times)
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W1UJR
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« on: December 11, 2007, 09:54:14 AM »

Lifted from -> http://www.earthsky.org/radioshows/51877/geminid-meteor-shower-peaks-december-13-and-14


Thursday, December 13, 2007

Our planet Earth is now passing through a stream of debris in space.

Some of this debris will enter Earth’s atmosphere to appear as “shooting stars” in our night sky. In other words, these next few nights are the peak nights of the Geminid meteor shower. Tonight and Friday night are great times to look.

The Geminids are one of the year’s best meteor showers. It’s a consistent and prolific shower that typically produces 50 or more meteors an hour, or about one every minute. You can expect the Geminid meteors to start flying around mid-evening tonight.

The moderately fast Geminid meteors slice through Earth’s atmosphere at some 35 kilometers – or 22 miles – per second. These meteors originated in a mysterious object called 3200 Phaethon, which looks like a cross between an asteroid and a burned-out comet. The Geminid meteors are named for the constellation Gemini, the Twins. If you were to track these meteors backwards on the sky’s dome, you’d find them streaming from a single point in the sky. This point – called the radiant point – lies close to Gemini’s bright star, Castor.

But you don’t need to know Gemini to see the meteor shower. Tonight’s Geminid meteors will streak all over the sky. Just find a dark sky, and enjoy.

So, remember, keep your eyes peeled for this:


or




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AF9J
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2007, 10:14:08 AM »

I used to do 2m, meteor scatter work.  I remember one time back in 1996 or 97, setting up portable outside during the Geminids.  I worked into the East Coast on 2m.  I was quite cold by the time I was done (it was only about 5 or 6 degrees outside).   Still, it was a lot of fun.  It was cool seeing a few burns in the clear, cold night sky.

73,
Ellen - AF9J
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W3RSW
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Rick & "Roosevelt"


« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2007, 10:29:57 AM »

Yeah !
Leonids, Persids, Geminids... 
Reminds me of a lot of cold, clouded out nights too.  How I wish this constant snow and rain belt we've been in for the past several weeks would go south.  "Georgia needs you."

Be gone foul vapours,
Be gone.
Heed the call of the Hopi.

I should know this; Would they be the Seminols that far up into Georgia?
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RICK  *W3RSW*
KF1Z
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Are FETs supposed to glow like that?


« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2007, 10:58:16 AM »

I was seeing a rate of about 30 an hour late last night here in verminmont....

Mostly high angle burns.... very short.....

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W3RSW
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Rick & "Roosevelt"


« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2007, 01:09:01 PM »

Short burns, Hmmm, you must have been up late facing the radiant, ho ho.
Last ones I saw couple of years ago had a few trails clear across 10 to 20 degrees.
Bet those trails would redirect a few radio waves.

Say, my prize Bull's come up missing... 
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RICK  *W3RSW*
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