The AM Forum
July 16, 2024, 04:32:46 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Links Staff List Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Delta Division to Poll Members  (Read 12342 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
AG4YO
Guest
« on: May 17, 2007, 10:29:37 AM »

The poll concerning regulation by bandwidth should go out today to Delta Division members.  You'll be asked to answer "yes" or "no" only to the questions.  Some of the questions will be:

1. Do you think you understand what ARRL's Regulation by Bandwidth petition would have accomplished?

2. Do you favor changing our band assignments so that any legal mode can operate anywhere in each band (i.e. there would be no subbands for voice, data, etc.)?

3. Do you favor having amateur licenses issued for the life of the license holder (i.e. never expire during the life of the licensee)?

4. Are you happy with the way ARRL has communicated the content of its petitions to FCC with you?  (The question is not about how you feel about the content of the petitions; just about the quality of the way in which ARRL informed you of them and the value of them to Amateur Radio.)

5. Are you in favor of separating our bands into segments for wide-band transmissions (e.g. up to about 4 kHz), mid-band transmissions (e.g.about 1.5 kHz to 300 Hz) and narrow-band (less than about 300 Hz).


Please read the questions carefully.  For me the answers are Yes, no, no, no, no.  In an email Henry Leggette, the Delta Director said he's probably going add a couple more questions.  If you are in the Delta Division, please pass the word and help others to vote.  Notice the 4kHz in question #5 would knock the hell out of AM use.

Thanks.
Logged
k4kyv
Contributing Member
Don
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 10037



« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2007, 03:36:05 PM »

Quote
Do you favor changing our band assignments so that any legal mode can operate anywhere in each band (i.e. there would be no subbands for voice, data, etc.)?

That is something I have long advocated in the past, but right now I haven't decided for sure whether I might have any second thoughts due to the elimination of the code test.  Also, they need to make it clear if they are talking about mode subbands only, or both mode and licence class subbands.

The absence of any subbands at all doesn't seem to be a problem on 160, so why wouldn't it work on other bands?

I am not unhappy with the way 75 is right now, but subband segmentation on 40m still prevents it from being the prime phone DX band for the evening and early morning hours that it could be.

I haven't noticed much increase congestion on the general class segment of 75 since the advent of no-code, but I have noticed many more riceboxes runing AM.  Most sound pretty good and the operators seem genuinely interested in trying to make them work on AM, but I have noticed that many of these ops (and I am just assuming most are no-code newcomers) almost seem alien to normal procedures for working AM on the lower bands.  For example, in a QSO, they tend to talk for a while (not working fast break-in), and then suddenly cut the carrier without any warning such as "over" or "go ahead".  I'm not always sure if they turned it back to me, if the band changed or if they had a crapout.  Others will abruptly, in mid-sentence say "QSL?" and drop the carrier.  I find this mildly irratating,  but I try to just continue with the conversation without making an issue of it.
Logged

Don, K4KYV                                       AMI#5
Licensed since 1959 and not happy to be back on AM...    Never got off AM in the first place.

- - -
This message was typed using the DVORAK keyboard layout.
http://www.mwbrooks.com/dvorak
Jim, W5JO
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2504


« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2007, 03:42:38 PM »



3. Do you favor having amateur licenses issued for the life of the license holder (i.e. never expire during the life of the licensee)?


Why not yes to this one?  I support the idea wholeheartedly.
Logged
AG4YO
Guest
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2007, 12:04:44 PM »

On the license for life, I believe that purging our ranks of those who don't renew is a good thing. Also on the chance Amateur Radio will be around for the next 20 years or more, eventually we'll run out of calls.  We're not like Canada or GB where that eventuality may take 100 years based on the number of Hams.

Thanks!
Logged
Pete, WA2CWA
Moderator
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8109


CQ CQ CONTEST


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2007, 04:48:51 PM »

On the license for life, I believe that purging our ranks of those who don't renew is a good thing. Also on the chance Amateur Radio will be around for the next 20 years or more, eventually we'll run out of calls.  We're not like Canada or GB where that eventuality may take 100 years based on the number of Hams.

Thanks!

I’m sure it someone was motivated enough, they could figure out how many calls could be generated from the current available set of numbers and letters. It probably numbers in the millions. And larger blocks of people are dying off as we move forward into the future. Running out of calls is the least of the issues moving forward.
Considering that “X” is a numerical value:
!X2
1X3
future: 1X4
2X1
2X2
2X3
How about:
3X1
3X2
While still retaining the maximum letter/number combination at 6.
Logged

Pete, WA2CWA - "A Cluttered Desk is a Sign of Genius"
KB2WIG
Contributing
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4467



« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2007, 04:53:19 PM »

we still got dem CB numbers to use.... klc
Logged

What? Me worry?
Jim, W5JO
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2504


« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2007, 04:57:53 PM »

As for purging the SKs from the list, that would be easy to link to the SS death index, which funeral homes enter the date of death anyway.  So you would have calls canceled within two weeks of the passing of an amateur.  It would be easier than processing all the renewals every year.

As it is, if a ham that hasn't been on the air for years renews then dies, the call is most likely tied up for an additional 10 years anyway.

Logged
Steve - WB3HUZ
Guest
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2007, 08:05:25 AM »

I hear some SK types on the air daily.


As for purging the SKs from the list, that would be easy to link to the SS death index, which funeral homes enter the date of death anyway.  So you would have calls canceled within two weeks of the passing of an amateur.  It would be easier than processing all the renewals every year.

As it is, if a ham that hasn't been on the air for years renews then dies, the call is most likely tied up for an additional 10 years anyway.


Logged
AG4YO
Guest
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2007, 12:13:24 PM »

Well Pete you confirm my logic.  With the code test gone, there will be millions of new Amateurs on the air in no time.  Just read the NCI and ARRL comments to the FCC.  We're about to be saved!  LOL!

Logged
Pete, WA2CWA
Moderator
Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8109


CQ CQ CONTEST


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2007, 03:18:43 PM »

Well Pete you confirm my logic.  With the code test gone, there will be millions of new Amateurs on the air in no time.  Just read the NCI and ARRL comments to the FCC.  We're about to be saved!  LOL!

There ya go; not running out of call signs is one less thing to worry about.
Extra and General Class numbers continue to climb; Advanced, Technician, and Novice continue to decline which is expected, but can't tell if it's because of upgrades, lack of interest, or just plain dying off.

I don’t recall the phrase “millions of new Amateurs on the air in no time” by either NCI or ARRL, but I personally have no incentive to track it down to verify it. I really don’t give a hoot what NCI says, and I generally support most ARRL initiatives. Whether it’s millions, thousands, or hundreds, I really don’t care. The “code requirement” ran its course, and now it’s gone. It’s one less requirement to worry about. I've already kissed it good-bye.
Logged

Pete, WA2CWA - "A Cluttered Desk is a Sign of Genius"
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

AMfone - Dedicated to Amplitude Modulation on the Amateur Radio Bands
 AMfone © 2001-2015
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.06 seconds with 18 queries.